3D Vision Blog

A normal user's look into the world of 3D Stereo Technologies

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DDD TriDef 3D Software Just Got Updated to Version 4.2

February 24th, 2010 · 5 Comments · Other S3D Tech

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DDD just released an new version 4.2 of their TriDef 3D which includes updated version of the TriDef 3D Media Player 6.6.1 and TriDef 3D Ignition 2.5. The release notes do not say much other than the Ignition solution, the one used to turn ordinary 3D games into stereoscopic 3D games with added depth perception, offers fixed compatibility issues with some games and contains new game profiles including Mass Effect 2 and BioShock 2. There are also some hints that DDD is working on adding active shutter glasses support in their solution, but it is a bit too early for that. But with the latest news we are getting from ATI it is very possible that DDD is going to support 120Hz LCD displays very soon, although it is not clear if 3D Vision for example will be compatible or only the new Bit Cauldron shutter glasses we are expecting this summer. Anyway, if you are using TriDef software with your current stereo 3D setup you should upgrade to the new version, especially if you want to play BioShock 2 and Mass Effect 2 in S3D mode.

To download the latest version 4.2 of the TriDef 3D Software solution…

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Using Acer Aspire 3D Laptop with iZ3D Driver Instead of TriDef Ignition

January 3rd, 2010 · No Comments · Other S3D Tech

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If you are an owner of Acer Aspire 3D AS-5738DG laptop you should know that this mobile computer uses DDD’s TriDef software to provide Stereoscopic 3D support for pictures, video and games, but since it is using a Horizontal Interlaced mode to create the stereoscopic 3D effect you can also use other software. This made me try the Aspire 3D laptop with iZ3D’s driver instead of the bundled TriDef software just to be sure and to check if there will be any significant difference when using one or the other software. You should know that both TriDef Igniton and iZ3D Driver still do not support DirectX 10, although both are working on adding this support and we should have it pretty soon, and as for DX11 it is still too early.


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When you install the iZ3D driver you need to setup it to use Interlaced, Horizontal (optimized) mode in order to have it working as it should with the Aspire 3D laptop. You can as well use the normal Horizontal mode, but the Optimized version is supposed to provide a little bit of improvement by doing some minimal vertical anti-aliasing as opposed to just skipping the unneeded lines in normal mode, although the difference it is hardly visible and there seems not to be any significant difference in terms of performance.

The next step was to try a game that is not completely problem free when played in stereoscopic 3D mode and to measure the performance difference by using both programs to see if any of them is better. The game I choose was X-Blades, because it looks quite good in S3D mode and is not too heavy so the Radeon 4570 video card in the Acer laptop could handle it. But at the same time X-Blades also has an issue when HDR is enabled and you try to play in stereoscopic 3D mode that becomes apparent when you move the camera with the mouse around your character. It turned out that the weird “wash out” effect is present with HDR enabled on both iZ3D and TriDef Ignition and then again the performance I got from both solutions was pretty close to each other. When playing X-Blades in normal mode, at maximum details, with no AA at 1368×768 resolution I get average of about 40 fps, but when switching to stereoscopic 3D mode with the help of iZ3D or TriDef Ignition the framerate on both goes to an average of 24 frames per second. There is just a slight difference if you turn the Autofocus function of the iZ3D driver On, resulting in about 2-3 fps drop. Have in mind that these results were achieved with PowerPlay disabled for getting the top performance from the laptop as I described here Optimizing your Aspire 3D Laptop for Best Performance in S3D Mode. The end result from the comparison between the programs that allow you to turn a normal 3D game into a stereoscopic 3D game is that they perform pretty much on par with each other in terms of quality, performance and even features. Of course each of these solutions has its own small advantages, but if you’ve bought an Acer Aspire 3D laptop there is no reason for you to additionally buy a license for iZ3D Driver as you won’t get a significant improvement at this moment. When iZ3D Driver version 2.0 comes out things might get improved, but also don’t forget that DDD’s TriDef is also being updated quite frequently and you can upgrade your Acer Aspire 3D laptop with latest TriDef software for free.

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Optimizing your Aspire 3D Laptop for Best Performance in S3D Mode

November 24th, 2009 · 10 Comments · Other S3D Tech

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The Acer Aspire 3D or the exact model I have AS-5738DG-664G50Mn is an affordable, but not very powerful in terms of hardware mobile computer that is designed to provide stereoscopic 3D effect with the help of passive polarization filters and DDD’s TriDef Ignition software. The main specs of the laptop are: 15,6-inch screen with 1366×768 resolution (don’t forget that the polarized screen reduces the horizontal resolution in half), the processor is Intel Pentium Core 2 Duo T6600 (Dual core at 2,2 GHz), you get 4GB of system memory, DVD writer and a 500GB hard drive, as for the video cards, it is an ATI Radeon 4570 with 512MB DDR3 VRAM. Now, as you probably have already guessed the mobile GPU used here is not the most powerful you can get and certainly not the best suited one for stereoscopic 3D, because of the additional load this mode places on the GPU and thus resulting in lower performance…


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However when running GPU-Z to see the parameters of the video card available in this Aspire 3D notebook something interesting has caught my attention. Note on the screenshot above that the memory of the card should be 800 MHz (1600 MHz effective) and even when under load (FurMark running in the background) the video memory still runs on 500 MHz (1000 MHz effective). Now this might not seem to be that much of a problem at first, but when you think about it… this is 600 megahertz lower effective frequency for the memory and the video card is not that powerful at first, so actually we have a very serious issue here and you can blame it all on ATI and their shitty mobile video drivers! Running 3DMark 2006 just to check what is the performance I’m getting with the fresh installed laptop (default OS and software setup provided by Acer) got me just 3052 points and although I did not expect much, I still considered this as quite low result.


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The problem here is that by default you get the PowerPlay function enabled in ATI’s Catalyst Control Center and this should be active for a laptop, as it is an option to control the power usage in order to save the battery. But, there is an issue with the drivers that does not allow you to go to the normal frequency of the memory even if you are not on battery, but are using the AC adapter, so at all times with PowerPlay enabled the video memory is running up to just 500 MHz (1000 MHz). What you need to do is to disable the PowerPlay function permanently or to disable it every time you are going to play in stereoscopic 3D (which would be kind of annoying and you might forget sometimes). So, as I already did say – blame it on ATI and their shitty mobile video drivers..


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Now, with the PowerPlay disabled you can get your video memory to run at 800 MHz (1600 MHz effectively) which normally results in better performance. You can see the difference even in the FurMark running in the background in heavy mode with 2xAA active – from 5 to 7 frames per second average. But then again running 3DMark 2006 gives better and more notable results for comparing the whole system performance for gaming purposes. With PowerPlay disabled and the video memory running at the frequency it should normally be running in the result in 3DMark 2006 is with over 1000 points better than before – 4134 points. This is just a little bit more than 35 percent performance increase and these 35% you should’ve been available to you by default and not taken away by, I’ll repeat myself again, the shitty ATI mobile video drivers!


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And since I’ve already started talking about benchmarking an performance, I will continue a bit with another results from 3DMark 2006, but this time to show what is the expected performance drop when you are with PowerPlay disabled (you have your full GPU power) and are playing in stereoscopic 3D. Running 3DMark 2006 through TriDef Ignition – the tests are run in stereoscopic 3D mode – results in getting 2384 points in the test. Doing a little math I can conclude that we have just about 73% performance drop. Now this is something to be expected from a more general stereoscopic 3D software solution like DDD’s TriDef Ignition, because it is universal and not tied to any specific graphic card manufacturer, so it is not that optimized as Nvidia’s 3D Vision. This in turn results in heavier load to the video card when playing in stereoscopic 3D mode and with the not that powerful VGA that the Acer Aspire is currently bundled things are not looking too bright for more graphic intensive games. Not to mention that thanks to the issues with the ATI video drivers and the additional 35% performance drop because of the memory running at lower frequency than it should things might be even slower. So forget about running Crysis on this laptop, even at low settings, but it is good for a lot of other games, of course you can forget about going for maximum detail level and AA/AF when playing in S3D mode…

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