3D Vision Blog

A normal user's look into the world of 3D Stereo Technologies

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Sony Vegas Pro 11 Video Editor Comes With Improved 3D Support

October 17th, 2011 · 8 Comments · General 3D News


Sony has just announced the availability of their new Vegas Pro 11 software, after the software was initially announced on September 9 during IBC 2011. The Sony Vegas Pro 10 NLE video editor was one of the first major professional packages to get support for full stereoscopic 3D workflow and Sony is continuing to improve it with every new update, as the case with the new version 11. Sony Vegas Pro offers a complete integrated stereo 3D video editing workflow without the need of use of external plugins and the new version 11 comes with extra tools to enhance and improve this 3D workflow. Here are the most interesting new things regarding the use of the software for editing stereoscopic 3D video:

2D and 3D Text Tools – Quickly create dynamic and visually stunning text animations and effects within Vegas Pro 11. Add 3D titles with the new Titler Pro from NewBlueFX, a great addition to the stereoscopic 3D workflow. Users can manipulate text down to the character level and on the X, Y, and Z axes. Stylized 2D motion can be applied to text events using the Titles and Text tool or with the improved ProType titler.

Improved NVIDIA 3D Vision Support – Users can now edit on single-display 3D computers including VAIO F Series 3D laptops and VAIO L Series All-in-One 3D desktop systems.

Vegas Pro 11 improves on its ground-breaking “no transcode, no re-wrap” heritage by adding native format support for stereoscopic 3D MVC and MPO files from Sony camcorders and DSLRs.

Vegas Pro 11 should now available for purchase wit Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of $699 USD, with upgrades from previous versions of Vegas Pro available for $199 USD.

For more information about the new Sony Vegas Pro 11 video editor software…

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Movavi 3D Media Player With Support for Nvidia 3D Vision

February 18th, 2011 · 1 Comment · GeForce 3D Vision


Movavi 3D Media Player is a relatively new commercial video player that can play both 2D and 3D videos in most of the popular formats. What is interesting about this player is that the stereoscopic 3D support it offers is also compatible with Nvidia’s 3D Vision technology. Aside from playing videos on 3D Vision, you can use the player to also display the video on normal non-3D-capable monitors in the popular red-cyan anaglyph 3D format. The player itself has some nice features, such as support for playlists for example, support for GPU acceleration of the video playack as well as easy tools for doing some minor video adjustments…


As I’ve already mentioned, the player is a commercial software, but you can download a trial version and test it for 7 days, before deciding to stop using it or purchasing a license. So I did download the trial and ran some videos through the player to see how well it will perform and try its features. What I can say is that for certain the player offers some nice touches that are missing in the free 3D Vision Video Player, but on the other hand it is also missing some of the more advanced options available in the free 3D Vision Video Player as well. The Movavi 3D Media Player is not so flexible on the type of 3D formats it can support as input, may have some issues with half horizontal Side by Side videos regarding the use of the correct aspect ratio as compared to the 3D Vision Video Player. The Movavi 3D Media does not have a graphical command menu overlayed when in 3D mode, or a right click menu with options for easier control, so you still have to switch to windowed mode change something and then back again in the full-screen mode. The last option is something that might’ve justified the purchase of the software for some people, but the lack of such features for a commercial software that also needs some further development may as well keep you a happy user of the free 3D Vision Video Player. Another thing that might be good for some not so advanced users is the fact that Movavi 3D Media Player is handling better with the support of different containers and codecs for the video files, less problematic than the 3D Vision Video Player, but also does not have the advanced filters and codecs tweaking menu that can also be quite helpful if you are a ore advanced user… especially regarding the use of additional DS filters.

In general I was not so pleased with the Movavi 3D Media Player so that I would recommend it as a replacement for something that you get for free, namely the 3D Vision Video Player, but it does also have its appeals. The normal price of a personal license of $44.99 USD (there are occasional promos with big discounts, currently available for $24.99 for a limited time) is something that I won’t be paying for the software at its current stage of development, but if the company keeps up adding features and improving the player it a few months it might become a good alternative of the free player. But you better try the player by yourself, as I said you get a free trial for 7 days which should be enough for you to compare it and decide for yourself.

To download the trial version of the Movavi 3D Media Player…

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StarCraft 2 Patch 1.1.0 and the Stereoscopic 3D Support Improvements

September 22nd, 2010 · 8 Comments · Stereo 3D Games


As I’ve already mentioned yesterday, the much anticipated patch 1.1.0 for the game StarCraft II: Wings of Liberty has been released yesterday in USA and today in Europe, although there were some delays on the Battle.net maintenance. So now the game has official stereoscopic 3D support for Nvidia’s 3D Vision active shutter glasses among a lot of other improvements and fixes also introduced in the update.



One of the first things you’ll probably notice after patching the game is the stereoscopic 3D panel available in the game options for control over the depth level and convergence level. A Nice addition, but unfortunately not doing so well with the 3D Vision IR transmitter’s hardware controls… the in-game settings override the functions of the IR transmitter and keyboard shortcuts and you cannot enable/disable the 3D mode from it or control the depth level, so you need to use the 3D options panel only!

Most of the small details that were previously in 2D like the mouse cursor and units’ health bars are now rendered in 3D mode. And although still some objects in the HUD remain rendered in 2D like text balloons over units and some of the in-game objects for example and these rendered in 2D over a 3D environment with higher depth may not look very comfortable. The good news is that there are just a few minor things left, so it is not such a bother. As already mentioned the mouse cursor is rendered in 3D changing its depth to match the level of depth of the objects you place it over, however for deeper holes or structures reaching high it is not yet working perfect, although it is still Ok.

What came as a bit of disappointment is the removal of the stereo 3D rendering of the cutscenes which are not pre-rendered movies, so they remain in flat 2D although they are consisted of 3D objects rendered in real time. The reason for that decision is probably due to the dynamically adjusting the level of depth/convergence in these scenes, because they do not match the normal settings that work for the game and thus Blizzard has probably decided to leave them out of the S3D for now (the stereo 3D mode gets forced to off by the game in the cutscenes).

The default levels of depth and convergence that are set in the StarCraft II patch 1.1.0 may seem a bit extreme for most users new to stereo 3D, so you might want ot lower the sliders a bit, but more experienced 3D users should be Ok with that and will probably be happy to even increase the depth levels a bit.

So the Patch 1.1.0 is definitely a good improvement for StarCraft II including the stereoscopic 3D support, however there is still some work to be done in the next patch for the game in order to make everything work not just Ok, but perfectly well in stereo 3D mode. So maybe in Patch 1.2.0 for the game we might even see the game receiving 3D Vision ready status after Blizzard makes it even better working in stereo 3D mode.



And here is a short 5 minute gameplay video from the first single player mission in StarCraft II with the patch 1.1.0 applied and of course in stereoscopic 3D mode. The video is available on YouTube 3D, where you can watch it online, but better download it from the links below in order to watch it with the 3D Vision Video Player or the Stereoscopic Player on your computer. The video is in Side by Side format, 1680×1050 full resolution and with all graphic details inside the game maxed, there is no AA applied however. In the video you’ll be able to notice some of the issues I’ve mentioned above that still need some work, although even now the game can be comfortably player in stereo 3D mode. Feel free to share your comments and experiences while playing StarCraft II with the new patch 1.1.0 applied in stereoscopic 3D mode…

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