3D Vision Blog

A normal user's look into the world of 3D Stereo Technologies

3D Vision Blog header image 4

List of the Available and Up to Date 3D-capable HMD Devices

February 23rd, 2013 · No Comments · 3D / AR / VR / HMD


We’ve had various Head Mounted Display (HMD) consumer oriented devices some with 3D support as well for years already and they still haven’t become a popular and widespread solution for Virtual Reality applications and gaming in particular. Aside from the fact that these devices have been updated in terms of resolution by using newer display technology and getting somewhat more affordable prices nothing much has been improved to making them a more suitable solution for VR applications and making them more attractive to consumers. Or at least that was the situation before the Oculus Rift has been announced and now, just a few more days before the first developer units of the Rift start shipping it is time to take a look at what other alternatives are currently available at the moment and what they offer in terms of basic specifications and features as well as how they differ from the Rift.


Oculus Rift Developer Version:

- Resolution: 1280×800 (640×800 per eye)
- Panel Type: LCD
- Video Input: DVI/HDMI
- 3D Input Type: Side by Side with optical distortion
- Field of View: 110 degrees diagonal (adjustable)
- Horizontal FOV: 90 degrees
- Weight: 220 grams
- Head Tracking: Available
- Price: $300 USD for the dev kit
- Official Website


sony-hmz-t1-t2-hmds


Sony HMZ-T1 / HMZ-T2:

- Resolution: 1280×720 per eye
- Panel Type: OLED
- Video Input: HDMI
- 3D Input Type: HDMI 1.4 frame packaging
- Field of View: 51 degrees diagonal
- Horizontal FOV: 45 degrees
- Weight: 420 grams (330 grams for the T2)
- Head Tracking: Not available
- Price: $799.99 USD
- Official Website


siliconmicrodisplay-st1080-hmd


Silicon MicroDisplay ST1080:

- Resolution: 1920×1080 per eye
- Panel Type: LCoS
- Video Input: HDMI
- 3D Input Type: HDMI 1.4 frame packaging
- Field of View: 45 degrees diagonal
- Horizontal FOV: ?
- Weight: 180 grams
- Head Tracking: Not available
- Price: $799 USD
- Official Website


carl-zeiss-cinemizer-oled-hmd


Carl Zeiss Cinemizer OLED:

- Resolution: 870×500 per eye
- Panel Type: OLED
- Video Input: HDMI
- 3D Input Type: HDMI 1.4 frame packaging
- Field of View: 30(?) degrees diagonal
- Horizontal FOV: 30 degrees
- Weight: 120 grams
- Head Tracking: Available (optional)
- Price: $749 USD
- Official Website


vuzix-wrap-1200vr-hmd


Vuzix Wrap 1200VR:

- Resolution: 852×480 per eye
- Panel Type: LCD
- Video Input: VGA
- 3D Input Type: Side by Side
- Field of View: 35 degrees diagonal
- Horizontal FOV: ?
- Weight: 85 grams
- Head Tracking: Available
- Price: $499 USD
- Official Website


As you can see there are quite a few different approaches, offering different features and with different specifications. What is common for most of these devices, apart from the Rift is that they all offer much lower FOV and that makes it very hard to achieve a good sense of immersion. With the implementation of the Rift for achieving a much larger FOV we see that what others needed was to change their approach, something that hasn’t been done for years in the segment of HMD devices. The side effect is that you get a device that needs a special kind of input, so you just cannot connect it to a PC and start using, something that you can do with all other devices mentioned here. And while this lack of universal support might be a bit of problem at first it also ensures that getting official support in an application or a game for the Rift can ensure great experiences and immersion, even though the resolution is lower than on some other competitive products. For example Sony HMZ-T1 and HMZ-T2, Silicon MicroDisplay ST1080 and the Carl Zeiss Cinemizer OLED all use HDMI 1.4 and rely on frame packaging for stereo 3D image support and the Vuzix Wrap 1200VR offers Side by Side support. This makes it very easy to use these devices for gaming with the help of already available software solutions such as Nvidia’s 3DTV Play or DDD’s TriDef 3D software, but what you get might not be very immersive as something that you’d expect form such a HMD, in a sense it will be much close to using a normal 3D monitor placed at a larger distance than you normally would use it from. There are other things that can be considered, but in the end it should be all about the experience you are getting, right?

→ No CommentsTags:·········

Sony Has Announced a New HMZ-T2 Personal 3D Viewer

August 29th, 2012 · No Comments · 3D / AR / VR / HMD


Sony has apparently revised their HMZ-T1 Personal 3D Viewer, by making a new lighter version with more comfortable adjustable headband and forehead support as well as providing a set of detachable and adjustable light shields. The new device is called Sony HMZ-T2 Personal 3D Viewer and while it is around 20% lighter with a total weight of 330 grams there is still room for improvement for something that you’ll be wearing on your head. And while making it lighter is certainly good, Sony has apparently not done anything about increasing the 720p resolution or improving the 45 degrees of FOV that the first model of the device also offers. There is still no information regarding the pricing and availability of the new Sony HMZ-T2 Personal 3D Viewer, but hopefully the price of the new model will also be made “lighter”. So Sony’s current Personal 3D Viewer as well as the new revised HMZ-T2 version will most likely remain as a good choice for watching 3D movies, but for gaming in stereo 3D mode we are still expecting a lot from the upcoming Oculus Rift.

→ No CommentsTags:·····