3D Vision Blog

A normal user's look into the world of 3D Stereo Technologies

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Stereo 3D Display Crosstalk Test Photos With Some Results

December 14th, 2010 · 29 Comments · GeForce 3D Vision



I’ve prepared two sample stereoscopic 3D photos in a Side by Side (JPS) format for testing the level of crosstalk/ghosting on 3D-capable displays, you can see how the files look like in the small versions above and in order to download the JPS files just right click on them and and select “Save Target As”. As you can see the test photos contain a photo only in one side and the other side is filled with white and black color in order to make the level of crosstalk/ghosting more apparent and easily viewable. Just open the two photos and look only through the left lens (close your right eye) in order to see the part of the image that is “leaking” from the one intended for the other eye. You can take a photo through the left lens and post the results below, just like the following examples…



Here is how the two test photos look like through the 3D Vision glasses’ left lens on a Samsung 2233RZ 3D-capable LCD monitor. As you can see there is ghosting visible with both test photos and there is a bit more at the top and bottom of the screen. The crosstalk you see here is due to the slower response time of the pixels on the screen and it is different due to the difference in transition between the displayed color on the photo and the white and black (the two extremes).



The situation with the test photos on Panasonic Viera VT20E 3D HDTV is a bit different, as there is no visual ghosting seen in the transition to white, but there is some ghosting visible with the transition to black (with some yellowish tint due to the glasses). Generally the plasma TVs have faster response time, but they are not completely ghosting free either, still the situation is better than on 3D LCD monitors as you can see comparing to the results from the Samsung monitor above.

You are also more than welcome to download, try, document the results on your 3D-capable display and then post the photos in the comments below, so that we can get a batter comparison between different 3D computer monitors and 3D TV sets…

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Testing the iZ3D Monitor For Input Lag Versus Samsung 2233RZ

July 30th, 2010 · No Comments · Other S3D Tech

Don’t ask me why I did not do this check earlier since I have the iZ3D monitor available for quite some time now, anyway here are a few comparison shots between the 22-inch iZ3D Monitor and the Samsung 2233RZ for which we already know that does not have any input lag. The iZ3D monitor is on the left and the Samsung is on the right on the photos below with both monitors connected to a single VGA output by using a DVI splitter cable as this is the right way to get correct results…







As you can see from the comparison photos there is very little to no difference between what is being displayed on both monitors at the same time. The first two photos show very slight shadow from the previous numbers being displayed, but that is most likely due to slower response time than to actually having input lag on the display. Anyway, I can pretty much say that the 22-inch iZ3D monitor does not have problem with the input lag and thus is a great for gaming for both plain 3D and stereo 3D without compromising with the player’s performance by introducing additional delays when displaying the image on the screen…

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Playing With the Service Menu of ViewSonic VX2268WM LCD Monitor

June 11th, 2010 · 9 Comments · GeForce 3D Vision


After the good results I got with the Service Menu on the Acer GD245HQ / GD235HZ in terms of reducing ghosting a few days ago, I’ve decided to try the same approach with the Samsung 2233RZ and ViewSonic VX2268WM. Unfortunately the Service Menu on the Samsung does not offer a lot of options to play with, but the story with the ViewSonic is completely different… the Service Menu it has is quite extensive, but unfortunately nothing else besides lowering the brightness level helped in reducing ghosting here. I’m saying that with a bit of disappointment and to warn you that there is not specific need to tweak the options available in the Service Menu, especially if you don’t know what you are doing! On the photo above you can see how the Service Menu on the ViewSonic VX2268WM looks like and what options it has available…



Now, on the first photo the Service Menu looks just fine, while the monitor is running at 60Hz refresh rate, but when you switch to 120Hz and call up the Service Menu it will look as on the photo above… it gets a bit messed up, although fully functional, and it is harder to change the options, so if you want to adjust something better do it at 60Hz.



With that said lets get to the point on how you can access the service menu on the ViewSonic VX2268WM, just another waring that you should not play with options that you are not well aware of their functions. It is best to take a photo of the initial settings, so that if you mess things up you will be able to return them back to their normal levels, before you started messing up with the values.

Accessing the Service Menu on ViewSonic VX2268WM:

– You start by turning off the monitor if not already off
– Press and hold the first menu button and then press the power on button
– Wait a few seconds while holding the 1st button pressed (the leftmost one), until you see the image on the screen
– Press the first button as you usually do to call up the menu and you should see an additional option at the top
– By default the new F icon at the top is selected, so you can press 1 to enter the service menu
– When you finish with the service menu just press the power button to turn off the monitor and then again to turn it on normally

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