3D Vision Blog

A normal user's look into the world of 3D Stereo Technologies

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Modifying All 3D Vision Control Key Combinations as You Need

July 25th, 2010 · 4 Comments · GeForce 3D Vision


There was a question over at the Nvidia 3D Vision forum on how you can change the default key combination for taking stereoscopic 3D screenshots (Alt + F1) to something like Alt + Z or any other key combination that is more comfortable to use or is not used by a certain game or application and here is the detailed explanation. Now, through the Nvidia stereoscopic 3D control panel there are settings that allow you to change some advanced key combinations as you see fit, but not all of them are there and the screenshot key combination is most certainly not there either. So we are back to some Registry modification to do what we need, but before that we actually need to know how the key combinations are defined as values in the registry and thus it is learning time again… ;)

The location for the Stereo 3D settings in the Registry

For 32-bit OS:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\NVIDIA Corporation\Global\Stereo3D\

For 64-bit OS:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\NVIDIA Corporation\Global\Stereo3D\



Inside the registry there the keys are represented by a number in Hexadecimal format, for example the 0470 value for the SaveStereoImage as you see on the screenshot above (the Alt + F1 representation). We don’t need the value in the brackets after that (the decimal number), because we are going to use the Hex values here, so when modifying a value int the registry make sure that Hexadecimal is selected as the type of data you are entering. So the first part of the number – the digits 04 represent the modifier key pressed in this case it is ALT, but the value can represent any of the following: ALT, CTRL, SHIFT and the WIN key or a combination between the multiple of these keys pressed. In the table above you can see what are all 16 possible combinations between these keys that you can use, with 00 meaning that none of these keys is pressed and 0F that all four are pressed…



The second table is a bit bigger and it represents the different possible virtual keys that you can use along with the four mentioned already modifier keys. The second table has 256 possibilities, but not all of them are listed in the table as not all of them are being used or available on a standard keyboard or are even not even used anymore. Using this table you can get the second part of the number you need to enter as a value in the registry to modify a key combination for a specific command. The value 70 here represents the F1 key and you can get that number by looking at the table and when you find the key you need first writhe the number on the left (7) and then the one at the top (0) and this way you get the value 70 for F1. If you need the value for the F12 key following the same method you get 7 on the left and B at the top, so the Hex value for the F12 key is 7B and if you want to get the ALT + F12 key combination you get 04 for the ALT modifier and 7B for F12 and the resulting value is 047B that you need to set in the registry.

Notice that there are some cells in the table with different colors than white, these colors all represent some specific and here is what every color means. The yellow color shows the combinations that you can use with the three standard mouse buttons and yes, you can also use the mouse for key combinations and not just the keyboard. The red color represents the system control keys, the green color is for the keys on the Numpad and the blue color is for any multimedia keys that you might or might not have on your keyboard, the rest is in white and it represents the most standard keys that you can use like the letters, numbers etc.

So happy modifying with your newly acquired knowledge, just don’t forget to make a backup of the default settings in that Stereo3D registry key as otherwise if you mess something up you might have to reinstall the 3D Vision driver to restore them to their defaults. Also have in mind that there are some values with keys applied to them that are currently not being used and are depreciated remains from the older Nvidia stereo 3D drivers, so modifying these is pointless.

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Getting More in-Game Depth Available for Use With 3D Vision

May 26th, 2010 · 11 Comments · GeForce 3D Vision


Some of you that have used the older Nvidia stereo 3D drivers may remember that they had an option in the Control Panel to set your screen size, but in the new 3D Vision drivers there is no such option available. Instead the size of the monitor is being automatically chosen when your 3D-capable LCD monitor is detected by the drivers and recorded in the registry, which may not seem so bad for most people, but can bring some inconvenience to some users that do like to have a lot of depth when playing games in stereo 3D mode. The reason for that is the fact that your depth percentage slider in the 3D Vision driver is directly connected to your screen size, so even when you go to 100% depth you may still find it not enough. You can however increase the level of depth you get using a simple method, if you need more depth that is, by manually changing the setting in the registry that reflects the size of your display size…



You should know however that the 3D Vision driver resets the value in the registry called MonitorSize to its default settings and with some of the older drivers the method described below did not work. The good news is that with the latest 3D Vision Driver CD 1.27 and the drivers version 257.15 this workaround is working again, so if you need more depth you can easily get it. But when you run a game with 3D Vision the MonitorSize value gets reset, so the actual workaround is modifying it after it has been reset. Depending on the windows type you are using – 2-bit or 64-bit version the place where you can find the required value in the registry you need to modify is different.

For 32-bit Windows:
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\NVIDIA Corporation\Global\Stereo3D]

For 64-bit Windows:
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\NVIDIA Corporation\Global\Stereo3D]

The value MonitorSize in the image above represents the normal number for a 22-inch Samsung 2233RZ monitor. You can see that the value in HEX is 2C or in decimal numbers 44, which is double the size of the monitor and there is very clear reason for that. Each number from the value 44 represents half an inch size, so that is why 44 actually represents a 22-inch monitor size with the idea that when you can change the size in half of inch you get better control than with 1 inch. So what you need to do in order to increase the maximum depth level is to actually decrease the size of the monitor, if you for example set it to 22 decimal (16 HEX) value this will mean that you have 11-inch display and you’ll get double the depth (100% more). So after this modification when you movie the slider for depth with one percent it will actually increase twice the depth than previously, but the scale for depth percentage will still remain up to 100% (it will not increase to 200%). The same can be applied in reverse in order for you to have lower depth level and finer control by increasing the monitor size, with 88 decimal number or 58 HEX you’ll get half the depth level than normally, but still with a scale of up to 100%.

There is a catch however as I already mentioned and that is the fact that every time you run a game with 3D Vision the MonitorSize value gets reset to its default value (44 for a 22-inch monitor for example). So what you need to do is modify that value in the registry each time you run a game, but after the game has started. You can for example ALT + TAB and run Regedit to change the value in the registry each time you need it after you run a game. You can also create a REG file that will automatically import the new setting for the MonitorSize value when you double click on it, again after you’ve hit ALT + TAB, here is an example of the code in such .REG file that you can save (name it for example monitorsize.reg) and use, just don’t forget to modify the value of MonitorSize in HEX, not decimal (the example value is with a 11-inch monitor or with 100% more depth):

For 32-bit Windows:
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\NVIDIA Corporation\Global\Stereo3D]
"MonitorSize"=dword:00000016

For 64-bit Windows:
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\NVIDIA Corporation\Global\Stereo3D]
"MonitorSize"=dword:00000016

And since you probably will not need to have more depth in each and every game, you may want to have higher depth levels in some games and lower in others, so you can get some automation for each game with the help of Batch files. The following example batch files will run the game Tomb Raider Underworld, wait for 3 seconds and then modify the value of MonitorSize in the registry to 11-inch display instead of 22-inch, effectively doubling the available depth levels in the game. You can save the example files (separate versions for 32-bit and 64-bit OS) with the name of the game to easily identify them like TRU.bat for for Tomb Raider Underworld, just don’t forget to edit the second line of the Batch file to point to the path and the executable file of the game you want to run. Note that here the value you set for MonitorSize (22 in the example) is in decimal not HEX numbers, so it is 22 instead of 16 (16 HEX equals the decimal number 22).

For 32-bit Windows:
@Echo Off
@START /D "C:\Games\TRU\" tru.exe
@TIMEOUT 3
@REG ADD "HKLM\Software\NVIDIA Corporation\Global\Stereo3D" /v MonitorSize /t REG_DWORD /d 22 /f

For 64-bit Windows:
@Echo Off
@START /D "C:\Games\TRU\" tru.exe
@TIMEOUT 3
@REG ADD "HKLM\Software\Wow6432Node\NVIDIA Corporation\Global\Stereo3D" /v MonitorSize /t REG_DWORD /d 22 /f

Any questions that you might have please ask below in the comments, also share your experience with this modification. Just be sure that you have the latest 257.15 drivers or an older driver that does support this “depth hack”, before complaining it does not work for you and starting to wonder what is causing the issue…

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