3D Vision Blog

A normal user's look into the world of 3D Stereo Technologies

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Bit Cauldron is Back, This Time Announcing Partnership with Optoma

September 7th, 2011 · No Comments · Other S3D Tech


The company Bit Cauldron was kind of away from the news for a while now, after the announcement of their partnership with Monster for the Monster MAX 3D universal 3D HDTV active shutter glasses using RF technology. And now the company has just announced that Optoma has licensed their technology for use in their new 3D-RF glasses that are going to be supported by Optoma’s new projectors, including the HD83, HD33, HD300X, and GT750. I’ve already suspected this with the announcement of the Optoma HD33 projector earlier in August, but not it has been officially confirmed. These projectors from Optoma would of course also be compatible with DLP Link active shutter glasses, but using the radio based technology developed by Bit Cauldron will come with its advantages. It is still not clear however if the Optoma 3D-RF glasses will be compatible with other products other than these projectors or not, as theoretically these glasses can be used as an universal solution like Monster is doing with their product.

The thing that everyone expected to happen with Bit Cauldron at first, and more specifically the company producing special AMD-based active shutter glasses for use with products supporting AMD’s HD3D technology apparently is still not happening. Since AMD decided to leave that to other companies and not get directly involve itself with licensing the technology and glasses and shipping them under the AMD brand, their partners are apparently not that eager to back up AMD’s open stereo 3D initiative. And this is the reason why we still don’t have so many products on the market that support the AMD HD3D technology with 120Hz LCD monitors and active shutter glasses and the most people that use it are either having a 3D HDTV with HDMI 1.4 interface or have passive 3D monitor of some kind. And while AMD is still struggling to attract new partners in their open stereo 3D initiative, unlike Nvidia and their 3D Vision solution, the company recently got Samsung as a partner to have multiple compatible 3D monitors with Samsung active shutter glasses. Just a reminder that Samsung’s first 120Hz 3D LCD monitor was 3D Vision-ready (it was also pretty much the first such monitor on the market that helped the adoption of 3D Vision) and now the company is moving to the other camp, probably not willing to pay licensing fees to Nvidia and thinking that they can make 3D PC displays on their own already like they do with 3D HDTVs. But will these new SA/TA750 and SA/TA950 3D monitors from Samsung be able to do for AMD’s stereo 3D support what the first Samsung 2233RZ 3D monitor was able to do for Nvidia’s 3D Vision is yet to be seen. On the other hand Nvidia has kept going with the same 3D Vision active shutter glasses for almost three years already, so it is about time form them to also introduce something new and better in order to catch up to the quickly growing and faster developing active shutter glasses for 3D HDTVs.

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The Optoma 3D DLP Projector Adapter 3D-XL is Coming in January

October 31st, 2010 · 23 Comments · General 3D News


It seems that Optoma is almost ready to to release the much hyped 3D DLP Projector Adapter 3D-XL that will add support for HDMI 1.4a input for stereo 3D content to 14 of the company’s 3D-capable DLP projectors as well as 3D DLP projectors from other brands. Optoma has officially announced more details about the adapter as well that the 3D-XL projector adapter will be available in January 2011 and although the official price is not yet announced, Amazon has already listed the 3D-XL adapter for pre-order with a price of $499 USD. It certainly won’t come cheap, but in the price there will be one pair of Optoma’s BG-ZD101 3D active shutter glasses sold for $99 USD and based on the DLP Link technology. And if you compare the price of a 3D DLP projector plus the 3D-XL adapter to a 3D HDTV or some of the high-end 3D-capable projectors that were already announced to feature HDMI 1.4(a) S3D support, you might still be saving quite a lot of money.

But why would you need to have HDMI 1.4a compatibility for stereoscopic 3D support, when your 3D DLP projector already can receive 3D data and display it? Well, actually you might not, unless you want to be able to lets say connect your PlayStation 3 console to the projector and play stereo 3D games on it, or connect a 3D-capable set-top-box, or a standalone Blu-ray 3D player. Of course that also includes other 3D-capable devices that support 3D video output over HDMI like the Fujifilm Real 3D W3 camera, Sony’s 3D Sweep Panorama-capable digital cameras and probably a lot other that are yet to come. If you need it or not is something for you to decide, but if you already have a 3D-capable DLP projector this adapter can prove to be a good way to ensure big-screen 3D viewing…



On the front side of the adapter there are just three buttons, one for turning on and off the adapter, one for switching between 2D and 3D mode and one for using one of the two available input ports. By activating the 2D mode you are practically doing a pass through of the signal to the projector and in this mode you can send 1080p data, but in 3D mode you are limited to 720p only. And considering the fact that there are still no 3D DLP projectors with native resolution of over 1080p this is actually not such a big problem, and when the first 1080p 3D-capable ones start hitting the market probably early next year they will most likely also come with built-in HDMI 1.4a support anyway.



You should be aware of the fact that your 3D DLP projector should have an HDMI input in order to work with this adapter as the output is only in the form of an HDMI. You can see that there are two independent inputs, meaning that you can connect two different 3D devices and switch between them without having to change cables. The adapter is designed to be used with DLP Link glasses, so there is no need for an external IR emitter, although the adapter has a 3-PIN mini DIN (VESA Sync) output available.

For more information about the Optoma 3D Projector Adapter 3D-XL…

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Optoma HD66 is Another 720p 3D Ready Home Theater Projector

December 3rd, 2009 · 20 Comments · General 3D News

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It seems that Acer won’t be the only company offering an affordable 720p projector with 3D support, as Optoma has just announced their own 720p 3D Ready home theater projector. Optoma HD66 offers a wide aspect 16:9 ratio and native resolution of 1280×720 pixels, the maximum brightness is 2500 ANSI lumens and the maximum contrast ratio is 4000:1. The new projector weights just about 2,3 kilograms (5 pounds). The projector can be used for either front or rear projection, it can be ceiling or tabletop mounted and will project images from 23″ to 300″ diagonal. There is a built-in two-watt speaker for audio playback, but you’d probably prefer to use something with better sound quality and power when playing games or watching movies.


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The HD66 is using Texas Instruments’ 0.65 DMD DLP chipset and has HDMI, DSUB15 (Analogue VGA), S-Video and Composite Video inputs, but as with the Acer there is no clarification what input you can use with 120Hz for Stereoscopic 3D mode. Optoma HD66 can project in stereoscopic 3D in 720p HD (1280×720), XGA (1024×768) and SVGA (800×600) resolution according to the manufacturer and of course requires you to use active shutter glasses, but is not yet officially supported by 3D Vision! Optoma HD66 has an a recommended end user price of $699. Now lets see who will be the first one with a Full HD 1080p 3D-capable projector… ;)

More about the Optoma HD66 720P 3D-Ready 120Hz DLP Home Theater Projector

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