3D Vision Blog

A normal user's look into the world of 3D Stereo Technologies

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Nvidia G-SYNC Technology For Better PC Gaming Experience

October 18th, 2013 · 3 Comments · General 3D News

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Apparently Nvidia has figured out a way to do a better synchronization between the GPU rendering the frames and the display showing them by adding an additional G-SYNC module inside the display (this means new gaming displays coming out with the module built-in them). The idea is that with this G-SYNC module you are supposedly getting a V-Sync off like experience in terms of responsiveness, but without the tearing of the image displayed on the screen. So less input lag and better responsiveness regardless of the FPS and supposedly no more tearing and stuttering. It all sounds great in theory if you are a gamer, but we need to see it first in action. There is still not a lot of information about this new technology, but hopefully Nvidia will soon provide more technical details…

With G-SYNC, the monitor begins a refresh cycle right after each frame is completely rendered on the GPU. Since the GPU renders with variable time, the refresh of the monitor now has no fixed rate.

This brings big benefits for gamers. First, since the GPU drives the timing of the refresh, the monitor is always in sync with the GPU. So, no more tearing. Second, the monitor update is in perfect harmony with the GPU at any FPS. So, no more stutters, because even as scene complexity is changing, the GPU and monitor remain in sync. Also, you get the same great response time that competitive gamers get by turning off V-SYNC.

The good news is that if you already have a Kepler architecture-based Nvidia GPU you will have the support available for the G-SYNC technology in your computer, so you will only need to get a new monitor with a G-SYNC module built-in. The initial partners that are supposed to offer PC monitors for gamers with the new G-SYNC module are Asus, BenQ, Philips and ViewSonic, all companies that also make 3D Vision compatible displays apart from Philips, and supposedly this extra module will not make the monitor significantly more expensive than a model without the module. There is some information available that the first monitor to support the new technology could be based around the 144Hz-capable ASUS VG248QE that also supports Nvidia’s 3D Vision technology, so G-SYNC hopefully will work just fine with 3D Vision in stereoscopic 3D mode providing even better experience (no word on G-SYNC and 3D Vision support from Nvidia yet). Have in mind though that the technology will be supported over DisplayPort interface only and the first G-SYNC-equipped monitors will probably be available in the first quarter of next year.

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Nvidia and Ubisoft Pushing Graphics in Games, No 3D Vision Support

August 21st, 2013 · 1 Comment · General 3D News

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Nvidia has just announced an what they call an alliance with Ubisoft to offer PC gamers “the best gaming experiences possible” for some of Ubisoft’s upcoming top titles to be released this fall, including Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell Blacklist, Assassins Creed IV Black Flag and Watch Dogs. Here is a quote about what this alliance means for gamers expecting the best possible graphics:

NVIDIA’s developer technology team is working closely with Ubisoft’s development studios on incorporating graphics technology innovations to create game worlds that deliver new heights of realism and immersion. One example is NVIDIA TXAA antialiasing, which provides Hollywood-levels of smooth animation, soft shadows, HBAO+ (horizon-based ambient occlusion) and advanced DX11 tessellation.

Sadly this news does not mention 3D Vision at all or at least stereoscopic 3D support and this comes as a bit of a disappointment for gamers playing in stereoscopic 3D mode especially in regards to Assassins Creed IV that has the potential to look simply great when played in stereo 3D mode as previously released Assassins Creed games have demonstrated. Notice that Nvidia is talking about “new heights of realism and immersion” and that apparently no longer includes native stereo 3D support or 3D Vision support and that comes a general lack of activity from Nvidia regarding 3D Vision for a while now…

The good news here is that we already have DirectX 11 wrappers available that allow shader modification directly by the 3D Vision user community playing games in stereo 3D. Thanks to Helix and the 3DMigoto we could still be able to modify some problematic vertex and pixel shaders (or remove them) in order to have new DirectX 11 games run with all the visual goodies, including tessellation, so that these titles could actually be made playable in stereoscopic 3D mode with 3D Vision even if they don’t have official support.

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The New Nvidia GeForce Experience 1.6 Is Now Available

July 30th, 2013 · 2 Comments · General 3D News

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The Nvidia GeForce Experience software has been out for a while and though not very useful for gamers using 120Hz displays to play in 2D or in stereoscopic 3D mode the software could prove helpful to gamers that are not too technical and just want to have the best possible performance that the hardware in their Nvidia GPU-based PC allows. Nvidia has just released a new version of the software, a version that a lot of people expected to have the new ShadowPlay feature that the company has promised a while ago to give the gamers ability to record gameplay videos using hardware acceleration from Kepler-based GPUs. A feature that would bring FRAPS or Dxtory-like video recording features with hardware accelerated video encoding with minor performance hit and H.264-encoded MP4 videos as output (not supporting stereo 3D video recording, you’d still have to use FRAPS for S3D video recording). Unfortunately the new version 1.6 of GeForce Experience does not come with the ShadowPlay feature, instead it brings the ability to stream PC games to the Nvidia SHIELD portable gaming device (starts shipping tomorrow where it was available for pre-order) over your home Wi-Fi connection. It seems that we should wait more for the release of the ShadowPlay feature…

Actually it is not only the Nvidia GeForce Experience software that is obviously targeted at not very advanced users, it seems that lately Nvidia is too focused on mobile gaming with their Tegra and Project SHIELD,
Nvidia Grid for Cloud gaming and bringing other new features such as support for tiled 4K displays (4K monitors look promising, but these require a lot more GPU processing power than Full HD). Not that this is a bad thing, but it seems that Nvidia is not very focused on 3D Vision and stereoscopic 3D gaming anymore, or at least this is the impression that we are getting. What we know for sure is that we’d hate to see 3D Vision following in the footsteps of the old stereoscopic 3D drivers that Nvidia had back in the day. If Nvidia is not actively working on their stereoscopic 3D game support as well as with game developers, we unfortunately cannot expect too much from AMD either as they were never that active into supporting stereo 3D gaming either.

Manufacturers of computer monitors are also kind of moving away from stereoscopic 3D support available on their products and form active 3D displays supporting 120Hz and 3D Vision they are kind of moving to just 120Hz monitors targeted at gamers willing to play in 2D at the higher refresh rate. What we are seeing is a lot of new 120Hz displays that are not supporting stereo 3D, though on the passive 3D front there are still quite a lot of 3D-capable products. Fortunately the guys at TriDef 3D are still actively working on improving their software that works on all GPUs, though it does not official support 3D Vision-capable displays. Hopefully we are going to see some new good for stereo 3D things finally happening after the summer ends…

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