3D Vision Blog

A normal user's look into the world of 3D Stereo Technologies

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Trying out the DVDFab 2D to Stereo 3D Video Converter Software

June 23rd, 2011 · 8 Comments · 2D to 3D Conversion

Not long ago I’ve tried the DVDfab Blu-ray 3D ripper software and was quite satisfied by the easy of use and good results that the software is providing. The same company also has software for doing automatic 2D to 3D video conversions, so I’ve decided to try that as well expecting the same satisfying results…



At first I was a bit confused as to where the 2D to 3D conversion functionality is in the menu, but I’ve quickly discovered that it is a part of the normal Video Converter menu. If you are going to convert normal video to 3D one you just need to activate the “2D to 3D” checkbox, after you open the 2D video file and you are ready to start converting with the default settings. There are a few built in profiles that you can select from a drop down menu, so you should be able to get decent results even if you are a total novice to video conversion.



If you are a bit more advanced user you can also play with the individual settings for the codecs and formats that you want the audio and video output to be encoded in, not that much options, but all the more basic ones are there such as audio and video bitrate, output framerate adjustment, deinterlacing of the source material if interlaced etc. You can also include subtitles from an external file that will get hardcoded in the video, although that may not be such a good choice for when encoding a 3D video, even though we are talking about 2D to 3D autoconversion here. When playing back 3D video files you can also have the subtitles loaded from an external text file, at least when playing the video on a PC, but if you are playing it on another device you may want them to be a part of the encoded video.



When you hit the “Video Effect Settings” button you are presented with an extra menu for more basic resizing and cropping, as well as adjusting the 3D output parameters of the output video. Of course the 3D options panel here is the most important, because from it you can choose the output format of the autoconverted 3D video. It can either be in Side by Side, Top/Bottom or into two separate video files each containing the left and right eye frames respectively. You can also choose between full frame output (original frame size) or half frame output, where you get the left and right frames with either half horizontal or half vertical resolution (squashed) in order to both fit into a common frame size such as 1920×1080 or 1280×720. The last part of the 3D menu is the most important one for the conversion, here you have two sliders where you adjust the “Visual Depth” and “Gain” of the output image, the names of these two however may not give you very clear idea on how to adjust them in order to get the best results (not well documented either). So it is up to you to play a bit with different settings in order to find what works best for each video file, the only problem is that you need to process the whole video before seeing the result, as there is no option to select just a few seconds to be processed from the whole video. So it is best to first cut a small part of the video in a video editor for testing in the 2D to 3D conversion and then load it in the DVDFab software to play with it.



With this software you also get CUDA accelerated decoding and encoding on some of the video formats which can help you get faster conversion times as compared to processing only with the CPU, fo course that will only work if you have a CUDA-capable Nvidia-based video card… and a faster one. And when you are finally ready to start the conversion with anticipation to see the result in stereo 3D you are presented with a nasty and meaningless for the normal user error message. I’ve tried with quite a lot of different video files and about half of them were giving me this weird error message, although the video files play perfectly on the PC I’m doing the conversion on and they are not damaged, and the other half were converted without issues. So you may also get such problems and I was not very pleased that quite a lot of my test files gave me an error when trying to convert, if it was just one or two out of 20 it should’ve been Ok, but half… anyway, the end result after a bit of tinkering with the conversion settings was actually quite good.

So what is the verdict about the DVDFab 2D to 3D Video Converter Software: quite easy to use by normal users, offers some extra features for more advanced users, has support for the basic 3D output formats, a bit limited on extra functionality that can be helpful. The lack of proper explanation about the two sliders controlling the 3D effect, the most important part of the conversion process, isn’t good at all as well as the fact that I’ve was unable to convert half of the 20 test files I’ve prepared. But the end result of the successfully converted files was actually quite good, so you may as well try to see if it will work better for you and hopefully in future releases of the software these issues will be addressed by DVDFab.

For more information about the 2D to 3D Video Converter Software…

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Movavi Video Converter 3D for 2D to 3D Video Autoconversion

February 19th, 2011 · 10 Comments · 2D to 3D Conversion


Movavi Video Converter 3D is another commercial software that allows easy 2D to 3D video conversion with Side by Side output as well as multiple anaglyph formats. The software uses the same easy and familiar simple autoconversion techniques relying on frame offsetting and deformation in order to produce the illusion of real depth in a 2D video. The software is commercial, but you can download a free trial version and test it for 30 days, the trial just inserts annoying text over the converted video, but it should not be a problem when just evaluating the software. The software offers multiple video containers and compression formats and has predefined output profiles for multiple mobile devices, but is useful for outputting in anaglyph format only. The Side by Side outputted converted to 3D videos can be opened and watched with the 3D Vision Video Player for example…



You also get GPU accelerated conversion to speed up the process if you have the compatible hardware, like an Nvidia-based GPU and even Multi-GPU configurations are apparently supported for even faster CUDA acceleration. The 2D to 3D conversion process is user controllable through three different sliders: 3D depth, 3D Shift and Perspective, but these don’t have very precise numbering system to give you information on the settings you are using. These setting are the ones that control how the frame gets deformed or the offset for the frames for the left and right eye and unfortunately there are no some recommended settings that can help you get better results, it is only up to you to find the best settings that work for the specific video.

Another thing that I’m not too happy about the software, especially considering it is a commercial solution, is that there is no some sort of scene detection to adjust the left/right frame offsetting used to simulate the Pulfrich effect. As a result when you have scene changes in the video that you’ve converted that are done via cuts and some transition effects you may get uncomfortable feeling when watching the converted video. And considering that the Movavi Video Converter 3D Personal license is priced at $74.99 USD (although there are occasional promotions running for lower prices), the lack of some small, but important features to differentiate the commercial from the freely available 2D to 3D autoconversion solutions is not acceptable. Still, if you are interested in the software, then you are welcome to try it out and share your comments about it below.

To download the trial version of the Video Converter 3D software…

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Movavi 3D Media Player With Support for Nvidia 3D Vision

February 18th, 2011 · 1 Comment · GeForce 3D Vision


Movavi 3D Media Player is a relatively new commercial video player that can play both 2D and 3D videos in most of the popular formats. What is interesting about this player is that the stereoscopic 3D support it offers is also compatible with Nvidia’s 3D Vision technology. Aside from playing videos on 3D Vision, you can use the player to also display the video on normal non-3D-capable monitors in the popular red-cyan anaglyph 3D format. The player itself has some nice features, such as support for playlists for example, support for GPU acceleration of the video playack as well as easy tools for doing some minor video adjustments…


As I’ve already mentioned, the player is a commercial software, but you can download a trial version and test it for 7 days, before deciding to stop using it or purchasing a license. So I did download the trial and ran some videos through the player to see how well it will perform and try its features. What I can say is that for certain the player offers some nice touches that are missing in the free 3D Vision Video Player, but on the other hand it is also missing some of the more advanced options available in the free 3D Vision Video Player as well. The Movavi 3D Media Player is not so flexible on the type of 3D formats it can support as input, may have some issues with half horizontal Side by Side videos regarding the use of the correct aspect ratio as compared to the 3D Vision Video Player. The Movavi 3D Media does not have a graphical command menu overlayed when in 3D mode, or a right click menu with options for easier control, so you still have to switch to windowed mode change something and then back again in the full-screen mode. The last option is something that might’ve justified the purchase of the software for some people, but the lack of such features for a commercial software that also needs some further development may as well keep you a happy user of the free 3D Vision Video Player. Another thing that might be good for some not so advanced users is the fact that Movavi 3D Media Player is handling better with the support of different containers and codecs for the video files, less problematic than the 3D Vision Video Player, but also does not have the advanced filters and codecs tweaking menu that can also be quite helpful if you are a ore advanced user… especially regarding the use of additional DS filters.

In general I was not so pleased with the Movavi 3D Media Player so that I would recommend it as a replacement for something that you get for free, namely the 3D Vision Video Player, but it does also have its appeals. The normal price of a personal license of $44.99 USD (there are occasional promos with big discounts, currently available for $24.99 for a limited time) is something that I won’t be paying for the software at its current stage of development, but if the company keeps up adding features and improving the player it a few months it might become a good alternative of the free player. But you better try the player by yourself, as I said you get a free trial for 7 days which should be enough for you to compare it and decide for yourself.

To download the trial version of the Movavi 3D Media Player…

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