3D Vision Blog

A normal user's look into the world of 3D Stereo Technologies

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What Should Nvidia Do With the “Optimized for GeForce” Solution

July 24th, 2012 · 3 Comments · Other S3D Tech


Probbaly not many of you are aware what exactly is this thing called “Optimized for GeForce” that Nvidia actually does not promote a lot, so you don’t have an idea what it is. Nvidia puts the “Optimized for GeForce” logo on products that have licensed their 3D software for use on passive 3D solutions or autostereoscpic 3D ones. Nvidia actually calls this 3D support for entry level glasses-free and passive 3D displays and unfortunately there are just a few products that carry that logo and provide support for the same thing that 3D Vision offers on active 3D displays with the difference being that on passive 3D displays you get half vertical resolution in 3D mode and half horizontal resolution in 3D mode on autostereoscopic 3D displays. The rest is essentially the same – the same number of profiles of 3D games, the same interface and control of the 3D effect, the same support and software for playing back 3D videos and opening 3D photos.

So why isn’t the “Optimized for GeForce” solution more popular and widely used on different 3D-capable products that have passive or autostereoscopic 3D displays? It is hard to properly answer that, but considering that DDD has teamed up with the two major OEMs making 3D displays in general as well as 3D monitors for PC – Samsung for active 3D and LG for passive 3D, it is probably not that easy to convince them or other makers of 3D displays that you have better alternative. You either have to offer better price for the license agreement or coming in other way, but there is one other major disadvantage that “Optimized for GeForce” has and that is the fact that it will only work on systems that have Nvidia-based 3D-capable graphics cards, so that essentially limits the users a bit. So the question here is why Nvidia is not more active with their “Optimized for GeForce” solution now, especially considering the fact that the other competitor besides DDD and their TriDef 3D software – iZ3D, has stopped developing their software also supporting passive 3D displays for a while now?

At the moment there are only two 3D-capable passive 3D monitors supporting the “Optimized for GeForce” solution and they are both from Acer – ACER GR235H and ACER HR274H, and there are two series of autostereoscopic 3D-capable laptops from Toshiba – TOSHIBA QOSMIO F750 and TOSHIBA QOSMIO F755. But in reality out there there are a lot of passive and autostereoscopic 3D capable display devices that should be compatible and may be able to work with “Optimized for GeForce”. So why doesn’t Nvidia go the same way with “Optimized for GeForce” as they did with their 3DTV Play software for 3D HDTVs – offer users of passive 3D displays to purchase a license and use the software with their 3D-capable hardware (with glasses-free solutions it may be a bit harder as there are various implementations available). This would actually give an alternative solution to those that use the bit outdated already iZ3D Driver or the TriDef 3D software and want to have another solution that might work better on other hardware, provided that they have a compatible Nvidia-based video card. Of course there are always other methods to make things work on not officially supported hardware like to use an EDID override driver from another compatible monitor, but while this works well most of the time, there is no guarantee that it will work in your case or will not give you different trouble, so it is not very recommended… but when you don’t have another choice.

What do you think, should Nvidia reconsider their strategy for “Optimized for GeForce” and offer it not only as a licensing option for hardware manufacturers to bundle it with their 3D-capable displays, but also to offer licenses of the software to end users of passive and autostereoscopic 3D solutions as well?

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Full HD Autosterescopic 3D Displays are Coming Soon… Probably

June 14th, 2012 · 1 Comment · General 3D News


Neil Schneider from MTBS3D has managed to do an interesting video interview with a company called PolarScreens during Display Week 2012, a company that is in the development of a Full HD resolution autostereoscopic 3D display. In the interview you the president of the company Jean-Etienne Gaudreau explains a bit more about the product and the prototype they were displaying. Definitely a promising product that we may be seeing on the market as early as next year and if you are a bit skeptical, because you might not have herd the name of that company, then don’t be. Actually PolarScreens is responsible for the development of the technology behind iZ3D’s 3D displays, so they are not going to be making the displays, but they will license the technology to a company willing to produce them and sell them to the consumers. These upcoming Full HD resolution glasses-free displays will apparently use 120Hz panels and will also feature head tracking, but single user only similar to other autosterescopis solutions already available intended for single user at a time. Still this technology definitely looks promising, so a thing to keep an eye at in the upcoming months.

You can check out MTBS3D for more interesting things from Display Week 2012…

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The 3DSteroid Now Supports 3D Displays on Android Smartphones

March 17th, 2012 · 1 Comment · Other S3D Tech


3DSteroid is an Android application written by Masuji Suto that allows you the easy taking, adjusting and saving stereoscopic 3D photos with a non-3D capable Android-based smartphone. The application uses the single camera available on pretty much any Android smartphone to guide you to take two photos and combine them into a 3D one and then view the 3D photos you’ve taken using multiple viewing methods. And now the latest version of the program also brings support for using the autostereoscopic 3D displays of 3D-capable smartphones such as the LG Optimus 3D, HTC EVO 3D and such, but still the software is not yet able to take advantage of the 3D cameras that some of these devices also have. The 3DSteroid application has two different versions, the normal one which is free and fully functional and the 3DSteroid Pro version that has some extra features. The Pro version allows the taking of higher resolution photos and also supports automatic adjustment for the two photos that are being combined into a stereoscopic 3D photo. Both versions are available on the Android market or as Google recently started calling it Google Play, just follow the links below for more information as Masuji Suto’s personal website hasn’t still been updated with the latest info about them.

For more information about the free 3DSteroid Android application…
For more information about the 3DSteroid Pro Android application…

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