3D Vision Blog

A normal user's look into the world of 3D Stereo Technologies

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Get 50% Off TriDef 3D If You Have an AMD HD3D-capable Video Card

November 5th, 2013 · 1 Comment · General 3D News

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If you have an AMD-based video card that has support for the AMD HD3D Technology (Radeon HD 5000 series or newer) you can take advantage of the promotion that DDD is currently running for their TriDef 3D software and get a license for half the normal retail price. With the help of the TriDef 3D software you can convert games into stereoscopic 3D format for playing on compatible 3D-capable monitors or 3D HDTV sets, as well as play 3D photos and 3D videos on your 3D-cabled PC. Have in mind that this discount will be valid until the end of this month (November 30th), so you should take advantage of that offer now and not wait for the last moment and possible miss your chance. What you should be well aware of however is that by getting the discounted license for the TriDef 3D for AMD HD3D software you will be able to run it only on compatible AMD graphics, so if you replace your graphics card with an Nvidia-based one at a later time you will not be able to use the software on it! The TriDef 3D software has a 14-day trial version available that you may download and try before you decide if you should buy a license for the software.

For more information about the TriDef 3D for AMD HD3D promotion…

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Will 4K Gaming Replace Stereoscopic 3D Gaming or Not

October 3rd, 2013 · 7 Comments · Other S3D Tech

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If you are already a gamer playing in stereoscopic 3D mode or are at least following what has been happening with stereo 3D you have probably noticed that lately stereo 3D gaming is being left aside and both AMD and Nvidia are focusing on 4K gaming as the next big thing in gaming. The question here is if 4K gaming will become the norm in a few years or it will have fate that stereo 3D gaming does currently have – not supported and left to the community hoping that it will keep it alive. Nvidia has done great by reviving its old stereoscopic 3D drivers and pushing both hardware manufacturers and gamers to go and try stereoscopic 3D gaming a few years ago and thus creating the big market for stereoscopic 3D gaming itself. Of course there were also other solutions already available at that time, but they did not have the needed resources and the interest in general in stereo 3D was not that strong back then. AMD on the other hand also supported kind of stereoscopic 3D, but it was “outsourced” to partners such as iZ3D and DDD, because the company never did have very strong interest in stereoscopic 3D gaming. With the boom of the interest in stereo 3D after Cameron’s movie Avatar and because Nvidia already had strong positions in the stereoscopic 3D gaming market that it has helped create, AMD had to do something more and the HD3D technology has been introduced. The problem is that AMD did not try to push game developers to support this technology (this often happens with the innovative technologies they announce) and while Nvidia has done a better job at first, lately they give the impression as they are not considering their 3D Vision technology as something they need to push anymore. So at the moment only DDD are actively developing their TriDef 3D solution and are pursuing not only stereo 3D on the PC, but also on other markets such as mobile devices and they are even offering a beta support for the Oculus Rift.

Meanwhile what happened to the market is that people yet again got interested in VR technology and gaming in VR environments mostly thanks to the Oculus Rift project and the really good feedback it got not only by consumers, but by developers as well. And just like stereoscopic 3D the Head Mounted Displays are nothing really new, they are just something that got revived yet again thanks to the recent huge boom in technology for mobile devices that allows you to pack good enough hardware in a small package and most importantly at an affordable price. The revival in the interest in VR gaming has also helped the development of various non-traditional controllers, but while the hardware is here or will soon be available the biggest issue that remains is the availability of software that will support it. With the Oculus Rift things are already moving quite well and with the introduction of the consumer version of the device in 2014 it could really be the next big thing in gaming and not 4K. Even the lower resolution development kits of the Rift have demonstrated that the resolution is not the most important thing for gaming, though it helps, it should not only be all about the resolution. The experience you are getting while gaming is way more important than to have some more pixels and that goes not only when talking about the hardware you are using, but also for the games you are going to be playing.

Let’s get back to 4K gaming and see what is happening there and why. Hardware companies already started promoting the new technology supporting 4K as 1080p or Full HD has apparently gotten old and widely adopted, so the industry needs to provide something new. Obviously increasing the resolution of a display is a good choice as you will need more powerful hardware that is capable of supporting the higher resolution, and before the technology starts to become widely adopted the prices will be high and the profit will be good. Both AMD and Nvidia will want you to buy not just one high-end video card, but two or even three in order to be able to play in 4K resolution at maximum detail levels in the latest games. And it is not only the video card, you will also need a high-end CPU, more memory, faster disk drives etc. so this will be driving the hardware market forward obviously. At the moment however not that many people are readily giving 3-4K USD for a PC and then again that much for a 4K display like the Asus PQ321QE (there are not that many options available yet) just to be able to got higher resolution.

The truth is that you can get much more realism and fun while gaming with either VR or stereo 3D and that can happen at a fraction of a cost that 4K would require at this point, so undoubtedly the question that arises here is if 4K is the next step in gaming or not? This depends a lot on how things move in the following year or two, so we need more 4K monitors becoming available and at a much lower price in order for normal consumers to start buying the hardware. For the moment 4K gaming is only for enthusiasts with deep pockets that love to brag about their PC being top of the line and it will be like that for some time. Sure it was a similar situation with stereoscopic 3D when it was reintroduced with the 3D Vision technology a few years back, it was more expensive, but not as what 4K costs at the moment. With Stereo 3D gaming it was the experience that it provided compared to playing a game on a normal 2D monitor that quickly drove people into adopting it and with 4K it is just more of the same – you get more pixels. And more pixels and higher pixel density just make the image look smoother and hard edges not so apparent even when not using AA filtering, so it does not add that much to the immersion inside the game atmosphere and making the experience more realistic like when playing a good game in stereoscopic 3D or in VR mode. So the future of 4K gaming for now is a bit cloudy and unsure and while you should not totally ignore it for the moment, you should not also jump immediately on the 4K boat either. The industry is not yet completely ready with the technology required for 4K, so it is best to wait and see what happens in 2014 before making a decision, and let us see if the sequel of the movie Avatar in 2016 will bring back the interest in stereoscopic 3D technology or maybe the wide availability of good autostereoscopic 3D solutions (glasses-free) in a few years or…

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Using a 3D DLP Projector in Stereoscopic 3D Mode with a PC

February 20th, 2013 · 6 Comments · Other S3D Tech

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The 3D DLP projectors are one of the most affordable solutions to get a large screen with 3D support, whether it is for watching 3D movies at home or for playing games in stereo 3D with a better sense of immersion. There are a lots of models available on the market using various interfaces and having different resolutions and capabilities and all of these may cause a confusion and as a result you may end up with a 3D-capable projectors that does not work the way you wanted it. There are a few very important things that you should be aware of when considering buying a new 3D DLP projector or already have one, but you still haven’t used its 3D capabilities and you want to try them out. One of the most important advantages, besides the large projected screen of a 3D DLP projector is the fact that the technology does not suffer from issues with crosstalk, unlike 3D-capable monitors or 3D HDTVs. So let us see what is the most important information that you need to know.

When talking about a consumer level affordable 3D DLP projectors there are two main types of modes being used for providing support for stereo 3D, these are frame sequential input (can be over a VGA or HDMI interface) or HDMI 1.4 frame packaging. The interface and mode being used by a 3D DLP projector is very essential on what else will you need and how can you use the projector, so you must carefully choose the right interface based on what toy are going to be using the projector for and even depending on what other hardware you have in your PC. You should be well aware of the fact that there are still no affordable consumer level 3D DLP projectors capable of providing 1080p resolution in 3D mode with high-enough refresh rate for comfortable gaming. So regardless of the interface a 3D DLP projector uses and the native resolution it supports you can forget about being able to play games in stereo 3D mode at 1080p resolution for now, but you can still watch 3D movies at Full HD resolution if the projector is with 1080p native resolution. And this is just one of the examples of the limitations and features you should be well aware of when considering to use a 3D DLP projector, especially if you still haven’t purchased one. But there are a lot more specific things…


3D DLP Projector with frame sequential support:

– You can supply the frame sequential output over VGA or HDMI 1.3 interface.
– The projector is limited to 720p resolution in stereo 3D mode as maximum.
– In order to use the projector in stereo 3D mode it has to be in its native resolution (can be up to 720p).
– Besides being able to use stereo 3D mode at 60Hz per eye, you can also use 120Hz refresh rate in 2D mode.
– You can use any standard pair of DLP Link glasses with it, there is no need for any kind of emitter as the technology uses special kind of white light flashes embedded in the image being displayed.
– With DLP Link glasses you are good to watch 3D videos with the help of any software player capable of outputting 3D in frame sequential mode such as the Stereoscopic Player for example.
– With DLP Link glasses you are not able to directly play games in stereoscopic 3D mode or watch Blu-ray 3D movies without having to meet some additional hardware requirements and use extra software.
– You can use DLP Link glasses to play games in stereo 3D mode only if you have a compatible AMD-based graphics card supporting AMD’s HD3D technology (Radeon HD 5000 series and up) together with the TriDef 3D softare.
– You can use Nvidia’s 3D Vision active shutter glasses together with their specific IR emitter to play games in stereo 3D mode if you have a compatible Nvidia-based graphics card (GeForce 8×00 series and up), you can’t use DLP Link glasses with 3D Vision.
– Have in mind that both AMD and Nvidia have a list of officially supported 3D DLP projectors, so any model out of that list may or may not work, so there is no guarantee that you would be able to use it.
– If you want to be able to play Blu-ray 3D movies then DLP Link glasses are not an option and if you have AMD-based graphics you are out of luck, all of the software players supporting Blu-ray 3D playback on PC such as PowerDVD have support only for 3D DLP projectors using Nvidia’s 3D Vision technology.


3D DLP Projector with HDMI 1.4 frame packaged support:

– You need to use the HDMI 1.4 interface on the projector
– The projector should be either 720p or 1080p native resolution, you will be limited to respectively 720p or be able to use both 720p and 1080p resolutions for stereo 3D, but wit the limitation of using 720p resolution at only 50/60 Hz 3D mode or 1080p at 24Hz 3D mode.
– Even if the projector is with 1080p native resolution, the refresh rate supported at it in 3D mode is limited to 24Hz which is good on for 3D movies, for games you still have to resort back to 720p resolution where you can use either 50Hz or 60Hz in 3D mode.
– With HDMI 1.4 3D DLP projectors you are not able to use 120Hz refresh rate in 2D mode as you can with the frame sequential models.
– These projectors still rely mostly on the standard DLP Link glasses, though there are some models available offering RF glasses as well, but due to the specifics of the HDMI 1.4 3D support the type of glasses used is of not much concern as long as the projector is compatible with them.
– The 3D DLP Projector with HDMI 1.4 frame packaged support do not have support for frame sequential input.
– You cannot use the Nvidia 3D Vision active shutter glasses with these projectors, you either need a generic DLP Link glasses or any other specific model designed for the particular projector (RF glasses for example).
– You can play any kind of 3D videos and movies, including Blu-ray 3D movies as long as you have a software 3D video player and a video card capable of supporting HDMI 1.4 frame packaged output.
– All software players with support for Blu-ray 3D movie playback such as PowerDVD will be able to play 3D movies if you have at least an a second generation Intel Core processor (Sandy Bridge) in order to have support for Intel’s InTRU 3D technology, and this means Intel Core i3, Core i5 or Core i7 CPU, Pentium processors won’t do as they don’t feature InTRU 3D support. For owners of AMD-based video cards the minimum is Radeon HD 5000 series (all AMD HD3D capable video cards should work, though some may not support GPU acceleration for Blu-ray 3D) and for owners of Nvidia-based GPUs the minimum is GeForce GTX 260 or GeForce GT 320 according to Nvidia (some of supported GPUs might not have GPU acceleration).
– When talking about gaming in stereo 3D mode, using Intel’s integrated GPUs is out of the question as they are simply not powerful enough and regarding the AMD and Nvidia-based GPUs the limitation is the same as with Blu-ray 3D movie playback above – you need ca graphics card supporting either Nvidia’s 3DTV Play or AMD’s HD3D technology that can supply HDMI 1.4 frame packaged output.
– Owners of compatible AMD-based hardware with AMD HD3D technology supported need to use the TriDef 3D software (the same as frame sequential users would), owners of Nvidia-based graphics cards need to use Nvidia’s 3DTV Play software (instead of the 3D Vision for owners of frame sequential capable projectors).
– Have in mind that both AMD and Nvidia have a list of officially supported 3D DLP projectors, so any model out of that list may or may not work, so there is no guarantee that you would be able to use it.
– Projectors relying on HDMI 1.4 frame packaged input do tech do have more input lag than models using frame sequential input for stereo 3D and while this isn’t an issue for watching 3D video on them it can be a bit of a problem for some (not all) gamers playing in stereo 3D mode.

You should note that the newer 3D DLP projectors using HDMI 1.4 for 3D support are not suitable for some owners of older Nvidia-based hardware that would work with frame sequential models for example such as the GeForce 8800 which although old is still quite popular and widely used product and quite capable for gaming in the not so demanding 720p resolution even in stereo 3D mode. And with regards to the increased input lag required for the processing of the frame packaged 3D input and the lack of support for 120Hz 2D mode the frame sequential models might still be more attractive for people that are going to be using them mostly for gaming. On the other hand 3D DLP projectors using frame sequential mode are more restrictive and hard to setup for users that are going to be using them mostly for watching movies in 3D whereas the HDMI 1.4 interface makes it much easier. For gaming in stereo 3D mode on a 3D DLP projector there is still not way to get 1080p resolution, so the far that some 3D DLP projectors with HDMI 1.4 interface are with native resolution of 1080p does not help at all as you’d still have to resort to 720p resolution when playing games in stereo 3D mode anyway due to the limited refresh rate at the higher resolution.

DDD is offering a trial version of their TriDef 3D software and Nvidia also does offer you to download a 14-day trial version of the 3DTV Play software from their website, so you can get these to try things out and if everything works then you can buy a license for the software. There is no trial version of the 3D Vision software as it is a part of the Nvidia graphics driver now and it includes only free anaglyph 3D mode, the 3D Vision functionality is tied to hardware requirements as well anyway. If you already have the IR emitter of a 3D Vision kit connected to a PC you get free 3DTV Play functionality, so there is no need to buy a separate license for that.


AMD HD3D supported 3D DLP projectors (frame sequential):

– BenQ MP777, MP776, MP626, MP782 ST, MP772 ST
– Dell S300, M410HD, M210X
– Infocus IN3116, IN2116, DepthQ-WXGA-HD, IN104, IN102
– Mitsubishi EW270U, XD600U, XD280U, EX240U, XD221U
– Optoma GT720, PRO350W, HD67, HD66
– Sharp PG-D45X3D, PG-D3010X, PG-D2500X
– Viewsonic PJD6531W, PDJ6251, PDJ6241, PDJ6221, PDJ6381, PDJ6211, PDJ6220-3D, PDJ6210-3D, PDJ5111-3D

Nvidia 3D Vision supported 3D DLP projectors (frame sequential):

– Acer X1261P, X1261-3D, X1130P, X1111, H5360, X1110
– BenQ W700, W710ST, MS612ST
– Canon LV-8235UST
– LightSpeed Design DepthQ HD 3D Projector, DepthQ HDs3D-1, DQ-3120
– NEC V300X, V300W, NP216
– Optoma GT360, GT720, HD67, HD66, HW536, IS500, XE149
– Sanyo PDG-DXL2000, PDG-DWL2500
– ViewSonic PJD6531w, PJD6220-3D, PJD6210-3D, PJD5351, PJD5111, PJD6381, PJD6211, PJD6241, PJD6251, PJD5112
– Panasonic PT-CW230, PT-CX200

Nvidia 3DTV Play supported 3D DLP projectors (HDMI 1.4):

– Acer H5360BD, H6510BD and H9500BD
– BenQ W1070, W1080ST, W7000
– Epson EH-TW6000, Home Cinema 3010, Home Cinema 5010
– JVC DLA-X3, DLA-X7, DLA-X9, DLA-RS40, DLA-RS45, DLA-RS50, DLA-RS55, DLA-RS60, DLA-RS65, X30, X70, X90
– Mitsubshi HC7800D
– Optoma GT750, HD33, HD83
– Panasonic PT-AE7000U
– Sharp XV-Z17000
– Sony VPL-HW30ES, VPL-VW90ES, VPL-VW95ES, VPL-VW1000ES

As you can see 3D DLP projector support overlaps quite a bit in the frame sequential models, though there are some models and brands covered by official support only by either AMD or Nvidia. Unlike Nvidia however AMD is much more open to support for projectors supporting HDMI 1.4 frame packaging as there is no official list of devices on their website. Now, if you already own a 3D-capable DLP projector that is not on the list don’t worry, there is still some chance that you might be able to make it work via a workaround solution, however you should be warned that things like IR emitter emulators, or EDID override drivers may or may not work in your case and even if they tend to work you might face different issues or problems and you never know if they won’t stop working soon. So resort to trying the different workarounds (some of which are also being discussed on this website) as a last resort if you already own a device that is not on the officially compatible list, if you are making the decision on what to buy now, better choose a compatible model fitting your needs and requirements, as this can save you a lot of trouble later on.

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