3D Vision Blog

A normal user's look into the world of 3D Stereo Technologies

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GeForce GTX Titan 3D Vision Gaming Review From Linus Tech Tips

February 21st, 2013 · 3 Comments · GeForce 3D Vision


Today the benchmark results from the new Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan video card started hitting the web, but most reviewrs that got the card to test seem to use just one monitor – 1080p, 1440p or 1600p. We even get to see dual or tripple SLI setups with GeForce GTX Titan and only a few get to test on multi-monitor surround setups in 2D mode. But can you get the maximum from a GeForce GTX Titan on a single monitor in 2D mode, seems most of the press thinks so, but what about multi-monitor and stereo 3D gaming when using the Titan? Fortunately there is at least some benchmark results that cover stereoscopic 3D gaming, you can see the short video review with benchmarks from Linus Tech Tips embedded above. Interestingly enough a dual GeForce GTX 660 Ti video card setup in SLI ($600-$700 USD) seem to outperform the GTX Titan ($999 USD) in 1080p stereo 3D mode, other reviews show that the same 660 Ti SLi setup gives better results than the Titan in 2D mode as well. This means that for 2/3 of the price of the Nvidia GeFoce Titan you can get more FPS with a 660 Ti setup, this suddenly makes the Titan not seem so powerful, or maybe just the GeForce GTX 660 Ti is just too good especially if you couple two of these.

Before seeing the first reviews I was actually thinking about replacing my two trustworthy water-cooled GeForce GTX 580 video cards running in SLI with a single GeForce GTX Titan, but now I’m not so sure about that now. I’ll wait for more benchmarks and hopefully more in stereoscopic 3D mode using 3D Vision and 3D Vision Surround, and so should you if you are considering upgrading to a GTX Titan or something newer as graphics hardware than what you already have, but suddenly going for two GeForce GTX 660 Ti cards in SLI instead does sound like a very attractive idea…

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Using a 3D DLP Projector in Stereoscopic 3D Mode with a PC

February 20th, 2013 · 6 Comments · Other S3D Tech

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The 3D DLP projectors are one of the most affordable solutions to get a large screen with 3D support, whether it is for watching 3D movies at home or for playing games in stereo 3D with a better sense of immersion. There are a lots of models available on the market using various interfaces and having different resolutions and capabilities and all of these may cause a confusion and as a result you may end up with a 3D-capable projectors that does not work the way you wanted it. There are a few very important things that you should be aware of when considering buying a new 3D DLP projector or already have one, but you still haven’t used its 3D capabilities and you want to try them out. One of the most important advantages, besides the large projected screen of a 3D DLP projector is the fact that the technology does not suffer from issues with crosstalk, unlike 3D-capable monitors or 3D HDTVs. So let us see what is the most important information that you need to know.

When talking about a consumer level affordable 3D DLP projectors there are two main types of modes being used for providing support for stereo 3D, these are frame sequential input (can be over a VGA or HDMI interface) or HDMI 1.4 frame packaging. The interface and mode being used by a 3D DLP projector is very essential on what else will you need and how can you use the projector, so you must carefully choose the right interface based on what toy are going to be using the projector for and even depending on what other hardware you have in your PC. You should be well aware of the fact that there are still no affordable consumer level 3D DLP projectors capable of providing 1080p resolution in 3D mode with high-enough refresh rate for comfortable gaming. So regardless of the interface a 3D DLP projector uses and the native resolution it supports you can forget about being able to play games in stereo 3D mode at 1080p resolution for now, but you can still watch 3D movies at Full HD resolution if the projector is with 1080p native resolution. And this is just one of the examples of the limitations and features you should be well aware of when considering to use a 3D DLP projector, especially if you still haven’t purchased one. But there are a lot more specific things…


3D DLP Projector with frame sequential support:

– You can supply the frame sequential output over VGA or HDMI 1.3 interface.
– The projector is limited to 720p resolution in stereo 3D mode as maximum.
– In order to use the projector in stereo 3D mode it has to be in its native resolution (can be up to 720p).
– Besides being able to use stereo 3D mode at 60Hz per eye, you can also use 120Hz refresh rate in 2D mode.
– You can use any standard pair of DLP Link glasses with it, there is no need for any kind of emitter as the technology uses special kind of white light flashes embedded in the image being displayed.
– With DLP Link glasses you are good to watch 3D videos with the help of any software player capable of outputting 3D in frame sequential mode such as the Stereoscopic Player for example.
– With DLP Link glasses you are not able to directly play games in stereoscopic 3D mode or watch Blu-ray 3D movies without having to meet some additional hardware requirements and use extra software.
– You can use DLP Link glasses to play games in stereo 3D mode only if you have a compatible AMD-based graphics card supporting AMD’s HD3D technology (Radeon HD 5000 series and up) together with the TriDef 3D softare.
– You can use Nvidia’s 3D Vision active shutter glasses together with their specific IR emitter to play games in stereo 3D mode if you have a compatible Nvidia-based graphics card (GeForce 8×00 series and up), you can’t use DLP Link glasses with 3D Vision.
– Have in mind that both AMD and Nvidia have a list of officially supported 3D DLP projectors, so any model out of that list may or may not work, so there is no guarantee that you would be able to use it.
– If you want to be able to play Blu-ray 3D movies then DLP Link glasses are not an option and if you have AMD-based graphics you are out of luck, all of the software players supporting Blu-ray 3D playback on PC such as PowerDVD have support only for 3D DLP projectors using Nvidia’s 3D Vision technology.


3D DLP Projector with HDMI 1.4 frame packaged support:

– You need to use the HDMI 1.4 interface on the projector
– The projector should be either 720p or 1080p native resolution, you will be limited to respectively 720p or be able to use both 720p and 1080p resolutions for stereo 3D, but wit the limitation of using 720p resolution at only 50/60 Hz 3D mode or 1080p at 24Hz 3D mode.
– Even if the projector is with 1080p native resolution, the refresh rate supported at it in 3D mode is limited to 24Hz which is good on for 3D movies, for games you still have to resort back to 720p resolution where you can use either 50Hz or 60Hz in 3D mode.
– With HDMI 1.4 3D DLP projectors you are not able to use 120Hz refresh rate in 2D mode as you can with the frame sequential models.
– These projectors still rely mostly on the standard DLP Link glasses, though there are some models available offering RF glasses as well, but due to the specifics of the HDMI 1.4 3D support the type of glasses used is of not much concern as long as the projector is compatible with them.
– The 3D DLP Projector with HDMI 1.4 frame packaged support do not have support for frame sequential input.
– You cannot use the Nvidia 3D Vision active shutter glasses with these projectors, you either need a generic DLP Link glasses or any other specific model designed for the particular projector (RF glasses for example).
– You can play any kind of 3D videos and movies, including Blu-ray 3D movies as long as you have a software 3D video player and a video card capable of supporting HDMI 1.4 frame packaged output.
– All software players with support for Blu-ray 3D movie playback such as PowerDVD will be able to play 3D movies if you have at least an a second generation Intel Core processor (Sandy Bridge) in order to have support for Intel’s InTRU 3D technology, and this means Intel Core i3, Core i5 or Core i7 CPU, Pentium processors won’t do as they don’t feature InTRU 3D support. For owners of AMD-based video cards the minimum is Radeon HD 5000 series (all AMD HD3D capable video cards should work, though some may not support GPU acceleration for Blu-ray 3D) and for owners of Nvidia-based GPUs the minimum is GeForce GTX 260 or GeForce GT 320 according to Nvidia (some of supported GPUs might not have GPU acceleration).
– When talking about gaming in stereo 3D mode, using Intel’s integrated GPUs is out of the question as they are simply not powerful enough and regarding the AMD and Nvidia-based GPUs the limitation is the same as with Blu-ray 3D movie playback above – you need ca graphics card supporting either Nvidia’s 3DTV Play or AMD’s HD3D technology that can supply HDMI 1.4 frame packaged output.
– Owners of compatible AMD-based hardware with AMD HD3D technology supported need to use the TriDef 3D software (the same as frame sequential users would), owners of Nvidia-based graphics cards need to use Nvidia’s 3DTV Play software (instead of the 3D Vision for owners of frame sequential capable projectors).
– Have in mind that both AMD and Nvidia have a list of officially supported 3D DLP projectors, so any model out of that list may or may not work, so there is no guarantee that you would be able to use it.
– Projectors relying on HDMI 1.4 frame packaged input do tech do have more input lag than models using frame sequential input for stereo 3D and while this isn’t an issue for watching 3D video on them it can be a bit of a problem for some (not all) gamers playing in stereo 3D mode.

You should note that the newer 3D DLP projectors using HDMI 1.4 for 3D support are not suitable for some owners of older Nvidia-based hardware that would work with frame sequential models for example such as the GeForce 8800 which although old is still quite popular and widely used product and quite capable for gaming in the not so demanding 720p resolution even in stereo 3D mode. And with regards to the increased input lag required for the processing of the frame packaged 3D input and the lack of support for 120Hz 2D mode the frame sequential models might still be more attractive for people that are going to be using them mostly for gaming. On the other hand 3D DLP projectors using frame sequential mode are more restrictive and hard to setup for users that are going to be using them mostly for watching movies in 3D whereas the HDMI 1.4 interface makes it much easier. For gaming in stereo 3D mode on a 3D DLP projector there is still not way to get 1080p resolution, so the far that some 3D DLP projectors with HDMI 1.4 interface are with native resolution of 1080p does not help at all as you’d still have to resort to 720p resolution when playing games in stereo 3D mode anyway due to the limited refresh rate at the higher resolution.

DDD is offering a trial version of their TriDef 3D software and Nvidia also does offer you to download a 14-day trial version of the 3DTV Play software from their website, so you can get these to try things out and if everything works then you can buy a license for the software. There is no trial version of the 3D Vision software as it is a part of the Nvidia graphics driver now and it includes only free anaglyph 3D mode, the 3D Vision functionality is tied to hardware requirements as well anyway. If you already have the IR emitter of a 3D Vision kit connected to a PC you get free 3DTV Play functionality, so there is no need to buy a separate license for that.


AMD HD3D supported 3D DLP projectors (frame sequential):

– BenQ MP777, MP776, MP626, MP782 ST, MP772 ST
– Dell S300, M410HD, M210X
– Infocus IN3116, IN2116, DepthQ-WXGA-HD, IN104, IN102
– Mitsubishi EW270U, XD600U, XD280U, EX240U, XD221U
– Optoma GT720, PRO350W, HD67, HD66
– Sharp PG-D45X3D, PG-D3010X, PG-D2500X
– Viewsonic PJD6531W, PDJ6251, PDJ6241, PDJ6221, PDJ6381, PDJ6211, PDJ6220-3D, PDJ6210-3D, PDJ5111-3D

Nvidia 3D Vision supported 3D DLP projectors (frame sequential):

– Acer X1261P, X1261-3D, X1130P, X1111, H5360, X1110
– BenQ W700, W710ST, MS612ST
– Canon LV-8235UST
– LightSpeed Design DepthQ HD 3D Projector, DepthQ HDs3D-1, DQ-3120
– NEC V300X, V300W, NP216
– Optoma GT360, GT720, HD67, HD66, HW536, IS500, XE149
– Sanyo PDG-DXL2000, PDG-DWL2500
– ViewSonic PJD6531w, PJD6220-3D, PJD6210-3D, PJD5351, PJD5111, PJD6381, PJD6211, PJD6241, PJD6251, PJD5112
– Panasonic PT-CW230, PT-CX200

Nvidia 3DTV Play supported 3D DLP projectors (HDMI 1.4):

– Acer H5360BD, H6510BD and H9500BD
– BenQ W1070, W1080ST, W7000
– Epson EH-TW6000, Home Cinema 3010, Home Cinema 5010
– JVC DLA-X3, DLA-X7, DLA-X9, DLA-RS40, DLA-RS45, DLA-RS50, DLA-RS55, DLA-RS60, DLA-RS65, X30, X70, X90
– Mitsubshi HC7800D
– Optoma GT750, HD33, HD83
– Panasonic PT-AE7000U
– Sharp XV-Z17000
– Sony VPL-HW30ES, VPL-VW90ES, VPL-VW95ES, VPL-VW1000ES

As you can see 3D DLP projector support overlaps quite a bit in the frame sequential models, though there are some models and brands covered by official support only by either AMD or Nvidia. Unlike Nvidia however AMD is much more open to support for projectors supporting HDMI 1.4 frame packaging as there is no official list of devices on their website. Now, if you already own a 3D-capable DLP projector that is not on the list don’t worry, there is still some chance that you might be able to make it work via a workaround solution, however you should be warned that things like IR emitter emulators, or EDID override drivers may or may not work in your case and even if they tend to work you might face different issues or problems and you never know if they won’t stop working soon. So resort to trying the different workarounds (some of which are also being discussed on this website) as a last resort if you already own a device that is not on the officially compatible list, if you are making the decision on what to buy now, better choose a compatible model fitting your needs and requirements, as this can save you a lot of trouble later on.

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New GPU from Nvidia Announced Today, the GeForce GTX Titan

February 19th, 2013 · No Comments · GeForce 3D Vision

nvidia-geforce-gtx-titan-graphics-card


Nvidia has just officially announced the GeForce GTX Titan, a new video card that is based on the much talked about GK110 GPU. And while Nvidia was trying to be very secretive about this launch in the last few days pretty much all of the important details have leaked on the Internet anyway. The new GeForce GTX Titan is just more of the same and what actually could’ve been the GTX 680 as hardware, the Kepler architecture pushed to the “acceptable” maximum it can offer in a 250W TDP. This means that Nvidia had to lower the GPU clocks, including the ones for the GPU Boost to levels that are significantly lower than the GTX 680, but thanks to the significantly increased number of CUDA cores the new video cards will be outperforming a single GTX 680 and are supposed to get close to the performance offered by the dual-GPU GTX 690 cards (even outperform them if there is no SLI scaling under certain games). It will be interesting to see how overclock friendly will the GTX Titan be, as if it can overclock to levels achievable by the GTX 680, then it can easily outperform a GTX 690 with SLI scaling well. The GeForce GTX Titan comes with 384-bit memory interface and 6GB of video memory, clocked at 6008MHz DDR (GDDR5), and while that amount of VRAM certainly is appealing it also arises the question what game can take advantage of the full capacity, probably none so far. Though when talking about multi-monitor Surround or even 3D Vision Surround gaming there are certainly times when 2GB of video memory may not be enough, but still games are far from needing such huge amounts of video memory, so it is probably more of a marketing thing than something that is needed.


Specifications of GeForce GTX Titan:

Graphics Card – GeForce GTX Titan 6GB
CUDA Cores – 2688 +1152
Texture Units (TMU) – 112 +112
Raster Operator Units (ROP) – 48 +16
Graphics Clock (Base) – 837 MHz -169
Graphics Clock (Boost) – 876 MHz -182
Standard Memory Configuration – 6144 MB GDDR5 +4096
Memory Interface Width – 384-bit +128
Memory Clock – 3004 MHz (6008 effective)
Memory Bandwidth – 288.4 GB/sec +96.2
Texture Filtering Rate (Bilinear): 128.8 GigaTexels/sec +58.7
Fabrication Process – 28 nm
Transistor Count – 7.1 Billion +3.56
Connectors – Dual-Link DVI-I, Dual-Link DVI-D, HDMI 1.4 High Speed, DisplayPort 1.2
Form Factor – Dual Slot
Power Connectors – 1 x 6-pin, 1 x 8-pin PEG
Power Consumption -250W TDP +80
GPU Thermal Threshold – 95 degrees Celsius -3
Bus Interface – PCI Express 3.0

* The numbers in red and green represent the upgrade or downgrade of the specific parameter in the GeForce GTX Titan as compared to the GTX 680!

The new GTX Titan also comes with GPU Boost 2.0, with the main difference in version 2.0 being that the GPU temperature now has the priority over the power consumption, as was the case with the previous version of the technology. GPU Boost 2.0 is supposed to automatically boost the core clock speed as long as temperature is below 80 degrees Celsius (the default value, but it will be user adjustable). There is also a new feature being introduced called Display Overclocking that should allow the user to increase the pixel clock of the display over the standard 60Hz to lets say 80Hz for example with Vsync remaining enabled. This is an interesting feature that needs to be explored as some people are already overclocking their monitors (some models that support it) to achieve higher refresh rates even with older GPUs. In the end the new GTX Titan just offers a lot more raw power for people that need it and can afford it and with a few new extras that you may or may not need. For stereoscopic 3D gamers the extra graphics power is always welcome, especially for ones that use multi-monitor stereoscopic 3D setups. But will the GeForce GTX Titan be better than two GTX 680s in SLI (hardly if it can be outperformed by GTX 690) that you can get for slightly less than what you will have to play a single Titan, this is yet to be seen.

The new GeForce GTX Titan is supposed to appear on the market starting February 25th in the US with a suggested retail price of $999 USD, the same launch price as the multi-GPU GeForce GTX 690. Considering the fact that the Titan may have a limited number of units available the price may spike a lot over the suggested one, so beware if you want to be one of the first owners of GeForce GTX Titan. For now we’ll have to wait a few more days, until Thursday at least, when we expect to start seeing the first reviews of the new card that include benchmark results and comparisons.

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