3D Vision Blog

A normal user's look into the world of 3D Stereo Technologies

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HP 2311gt is a Passive 23-inch 3D-capable LCD Monitor

November 1st, 2011 · 5 Comments · General 3D News


HP is finally joining in with a 3D LCD monitor, after the company also released a 3D-capable laptop quite a while ago in the Envy product line. What is interesting in this announcement is that the HP 2311gt monitor is a passive 3D solution and not an active 3D one as HP has shown last year with HP 2310g. So it seems that we won’t be seeing a 3D Vision-ready monitor for now from HP and they have apparently abandoned the idea to release the active HP 2310g 3D LCD monitor and have replaced it with the HP 2311gt passive 3D model.

The 23-inch HP 2311gt LED backlit 3D monitor uses Film Patterned Retarder (FPR) technology, offers native 1920×1080 resolution, comes bundled with 2 pairs of passive 3D glasses, Cyberlink PowerDVD software bundled to offer 2D to 3D video conversion and playback as well as DDD’s TriDef Ignition software for playing games in stereoscopic 3D format. This new 3D monitor from HP is apparently already available in some parts of Europe…

HP 2311gt Monitor Specifications:

Viewable Image Size: 58.42 cm (23.0-inch) diagonal
Display Type: TN LCD active matrix
Response time: 5 ms typical
Pixel Pitch: 0.265 mm
Brightness: 200-250 cd/m² (2D mode); 100 cd/m² (3D mode)
Contrast ratio: 1000:1 static; 3000000:1 dynamic (2D mode)
View angle: 170° horizontal, 160° (2D mode) and 12° (3D mode) vertical
Maximum Graphics Resolution in 2D: 1920×1080 @ 60 Hz
Maximum Graphics Resolution in 3D: 1920×540 @ 60 Hz
3D Glasses: 3D Passive FPR (Film-type Patterned Retarder) Glasses
Video Input Terminals: VGA, DVI, and HDMI
Power Consumption: 45 watts max, 33 watts typical, 0.5 watts sleep
Dimensions (W x D x H): 557.95×159.0x416.48 mm (21.97×6.26×16.40 in)
Maximum Weight: 4.3 kg (9.5 lb)

What is interesting is the fact that HP is giving out all the not so attractive specs that most of other makers of passive 3D monitors tend to “forget” to mention to the customers. I’m talking about things like the reduced brightness in 3D mode, the very small vertical viewing angle in 3D mode, the lower resolution in 3D mode. Most others just save you these important things and focus on the better points in passive versus active 3D solutions, leaving the impression that it is much better and does not have any drawbacks.

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3D Vision Active Shutter Glasses and Monitor Color Reproduction

October 19th, 2011 · 2 Comments · GeForce 3D Vision

It is time for results of the interesting testing I’ve done on how the color reproduction of a 3D LCD monitor is affected in different refresh rates and modes – 2D and stereo 3D with the use of 3D Vision. I’ve used Acer GN245HQ 3D Vision ready 120Hz LCD monitor along with an X-rite colorimeter to measure the display characteristics, along with a lens from a pair of 3D Vision glasses to measure through. Notice how the color accuracy as well as the level of brightness changes with and without the 3D Vision lenses in different operational modes of the display, have in mind that the measurements were made directly through the lens with it being in inactive (open) state…





Starting with 60Hz refresh rate, measuring the default color reproduction of the monitor on top and through the 3D Vision glasses on the bottom. The situation isn’t very different, apart from the fact that the brightness gets reduced significantly and there is a bit more difference in the color temperature.





Moving to 120Hz refresh rate, a bit better results with color reproduction as compared to the 60Hz mode, obviously as the monitor is intended to be used with 120Hz refresh rate. Again higher color deviation through the lenses of the 3D Vision glasses, but the most important par here as well is the reduction of brightness with pretty much the same level as with the 60Hz refresh.





The results in 120Hz 3D mode are a bit different though. Even more reduction of the brightness and bigger color deviation, however there is one important thing here and that is the fact that in this mode each eye should be getting different image in 3D mode, so it is hard to exactly measure the results in such a mode, so it is possible that the color reproduction is better than what the calorimeter detects when using the full 120Hz refresh rate in 3D mode to display the same content.

Now, the next thing that immediately comes to my mind is what will happen if I do a color calibration of the display through the lenses of the 3D Vision glasses, how will this affect the monitor’s color reproduction visually and how the image will look without the glasses? Now, since color calibration does not affect the color reproduction in games when you play in full-screen stereo 3D mode you can only make the image look better when you are wearing the glasses and doing something on the desktop. Not that you would need a very accurate color reproduction in games as pretty much all of them were not designed with that in mind anyway. Surprisingly enough after calibrating the display through one of the lenses of the 3D Vision glasses visually the image on the display looked very nice visually when wearing the glasses, apart from the reduced brightness that is expected anyway. And when not wearing them the image on the screen also looks very nice visually, only the color temperature is more significantly off to the colder bluish levels.

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Be Careful With the 3D-capable LCD Monitors Supporting HDMI 1.4a

February 11th, 2011 · 26 Comments · Other S3D Tech


Acer is the first company that already has a 3D-capable LCD monitor with support for stereo 3D over HDMI 1.4a and this is the model Acer HS244HQ (it uses only HDMI) and will have two more models that will have stereo 3D support over both Dual-Link DVI and HDMI 1.4a – the Acer GN245HQ and Acer HN274H. This for a lot of people automatically means that they would be able to replace the need of a 3D HDTV with one of these 3D LCD monitors, but this is not entirely true. You should be for example able to connect any 3D-capable device that outputs stereo 3D content using the frame packaging method defined in the HDMI 1.4(a) specification such as a PlayStation 3 console. But you will not be able to use an Xbox 360 console in 3D mode with games that do have native stereoscopic 3D support with the reason for that being the fact that the Xbox 360 can output stereo 3D in various formats, but not in the frame packaged format. Usually the Xbox 360 uses Side by Side output and that is something that you can manually switch from a 3D HDTV, but not from the any of the mentioned above monitors as the do no have built-in support for any of these additional modes. So again, a word of warning when you are planning what to buy – a 3D HDTV or a 3D-capable monitor with support for HDMI 1.4a, based on what you are going to use it for…

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