3D Vision Blog

A normal user's look into the world of 3D Stereo Technologies

3D Vision Blog header image 1

Asus ROG Swift PG278Q is the First Official Nvidia G-SYNC Monitor

January 7th, 2014 · 8 Comments · GeForce 3D Vision


Here comes the announcement of the first Nvidia G-SYNC enabled monitor at CES 2014 fromm ASUS – the ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q. The monitor supports WQHD 2560×1440 resolution and ASUS says it is a 120+ Hz display, so this is also the first monitor to officially support 120Hz refresh rate with a resolution over 1920×1080. What is not so good news for some people is the that the display probably uses a TN panel, something that is suggested by the announced 1ms response time. And the other not so good news is that there is not a single mention of 3D Vision support, so apparently this display from ASUS is not 3D-capable, meaning we are still don’t have a 3D Vision monitor with a resolution higher than 1080p.

The ROG SWIFT PG278Q is also the world’s first WQHD monitor powered by NVIDIA G-SYNC technology. NVIDIA G-SYNC, a breakthrough in display technology, synchronizes the display’s refresh rates to the GPU. The ROG SWIFT PG278Q eliminates screen tearing, minimizes stutter and input lag to deliver the smoothest gaming experience possible. With G-SYNC technology objects look sharper and more vibrant, while gameplay is more fluid and responsive.

ASUS ROG SWIFT PG278Q Specifications:

– Display: 27-inch WQHD 2560×1440 (16:9)
– Narrow 6mm bezel designed for multi-monitor setups
– Pixel Pitch: 0.233mm
– Brightness: 350cd/m2
– Display Colors: 16.7M
– Refresh Rate: Over 120 Hz
– Response Time: 1ms (GTG)
– Connectivity: 1x DisplayPort 1.2, 2x USB 3.0 ports
– Stand Adjustments: tilt (+20° ~ -5°), swivel (+60° ~ -60°), pivot (90° clockwise), height adjustment (0 ~ 120mm)
– VESA-wall mountable (100 × 100mm)
– Special ASUS Features: GamePlus and 5-way joystick OSD navigation

According to ASUS the ROG SWIFT PG278Q monitor availability is expected at the beginning Q2 this year for the Asian Pacific, European and North America markets. So we can expect to see this monitor available as early April this year with an expected price of $799 USD. As a comparison you might be able to get earlier an ASUS VG248QE monitor modified to support Nvidia’s G-SYNC technology for about $500 USD, however this is a 24-inch model with 1920×1080 resolution and the ASUS ROG SWIFT PG278Q monitor is 27-inch and with 2560×1440 resolution. It would’ve been nice if this was also announced as a 3D Vision monitor, but there is still some time left until it’s release, so it could get certified by the time for the official release on the market as it has the required features to support stereoscopic 3D as well.

→ 8 CommentsTags:······

A Little Bit More Details About the Nvidia G-SYNC Technology

January 6th, 2014 · 3 Comments · General 3D News


Just a few days ago I was talking about Nvidia’s G-SYNC technology and the fact that the early DIY upgrade modules are still not widely available, not to mention that there was also not a lot of information regarding the first wave of monitors that are supposed to come out with G-SYNC support built-in. Well, in the Nvidia CES Press Event the company has revealed a bit more information about the G-SYNC tech, namely the Q2 availability from Acer, AOC, ASUS, BEnQ, Philps and ViewSonic. And on the slide that Nvidia’s CEO Jen-Hsun Huang has shown you can also see that we are getting not only 24″ and 27″ displays with 1080p resolution that will support G-SYNC, but there will be also 27-inch models with 2560×1440 resolution. There is no hint however if these higher resolution models will feature higher refresh rate than 60Hz or if there will be 3D Vision support, in fact there was nothing about 3D Vision mentioned along with the G-SYNC talk in the press event, though the G-SYNC part was not the main focus either. We already know that Nvidia’s G-SYNC technology is compatible with 3D Vision, but the two technologies can be available and work separately as well, so there is no guarantee that we are going to see higher resolution displays with stereoscopic 3D support coming with G-SYNC support as well. The same goes for 120Hz or 144Hz refresh rate on displays with resolution higher than Full HD that, even though the Display Port interface used for G-SYNC is already capable of supporting this, so we’ll have to wait and see when display manufacturers start announcing their new products with G-SYNC technology later this year.


Meanwhile if you are interested in more details about the G-SYNC DIY Upgrade modules – what they are and how they are installed, then you might want to take a look at the review that the guys at PC Perspective have just published. In it they show in quite a lot details what the upgrade kit is and the installation process, though unfortunately you still cannot get the module only and install it yourself as so far it is only been offered though just a few companies that provide the installation service or sell you an already modified product. I’ve already discussed the official Nvidia partners in a previous post, so I’ll just mention the fact that the G-SYNC DIY Upgrade Kits are still only available in US. And with the just announced expected Q2 availability of monitors with built-in G-SYNC support you might want to wait for these to become available, than to consider getting an upgrade kit or modified version of the ASUS VG248QE monitor…

For the PC Perspective’s review of the Nvidia G-SYNC DIY Upgrade modules…

→ 3 CommentsTags:·······

Still Limited Availability of Nvidia G-Sync DIY Upgrade Modules

December 28th, 2013 · 4 Comments · General 3D News


Nvidia has promised that by the end of the year they will have the G-Sync DIY Upgrade modules available to the most eager enthusiasts that want to get their hands on the technology as early as possible and they kind of delivered on that promise. The G-Sync DIY upgrade module is intended for owners of ASUS VG248QE monitors that want to upgrade their displays or for people that are interested in buying already upgraded monitors with the module installed by professionals. And I’m saying that they kind of delivered on their promise, because currently there are 4 partners of Nvidia that supposedly offer either an upgrade services to make your ASUS VG248QE monitor G-Sync ready or to sell you an already upgraded monitor. The problem is that all of these four companies are US-based and while with some you might be able to get an overseas delivery, the shipment of a $500 US dollars monitor would end up quite expensive when you add all the taxes on top of the price.

The four Nvidia G-Sync partners that are already announced by Nvidia are:
Falcon Northwest
Overlord Computer

The first two: Falcon Northwest and MAINGEAR are only selling new computers where you can add a G-Sync modified ASUS VG248QE monitor along with your PC for about $500 US or a bit more. The other two companies DigitalStorm and Overlord Computer can either sell you a new G-Sync modified monitor only for about $500 US or a bit less or modify your own monitor (you need to send it to them) for $299 US or a bit less. The option for purchasing the DIY module only directly and installing it yourself if you are a good technical guy is still not available. Hopefully in January 2014 we are going to see better availability of the G-Sync DIY upgrade modules including availability not only in US, so people that live in Europe and other countries could also have access of the technology and the benefits it offers. Also in the first quarter of the new year we are probably going to see announcements for new G-Sync-enabled monitors, so you might want to wait a bit more and get one of those now anyway…

→ 4 CommentsTags:··············