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Highlights from the 25th Annual Stereoscopic Displays and Applications (SD&A) Conference

March 5th, 2014 · No Comments · Stereo 3D Events

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The 25th annual meeting of the Stereoscopic Displays & Applications (SD&A) conference, part of the IS&T/SPIE Electronic Imaging 2014 symposium, brought together researchers and practitioners of 3D capture, display, processing, and perception from around the world.

Topics of the more than 75 oral and poster presentations spanned: the design and applications of stereoscopic 3D displays, autostereoscopic displays, quality assessment, depth map processing, and human factors. Of particular interest were two keynote presentations. Jeff Joseph, producer of World 3D Film Expo, discussed the history and lineage of numerous early stereoscopic films. Gordon Wetzstein of the MIT Media Laboratory offered inspirational recommendations for new directions in 3D display research, grounded in the combination of fast computation, optics, and mathematical optimization.

This year’s Discussion Forum was a candid inquiry into the state and prognosis of 3D in entertainment. Moderated by Lenny Lipton, panelists included: David Cohen (Variety Media, LLC), Barry Sandrew (Legend Films, Inc.) and Chris Ward (Lightspeed Design, Inc.). One question that the panelists explored was, “If the audience must pay a fee for to see the 3D version of a movie, will they expect significant use of stereoscopic effects?”

Every year, SD&A attendees have the opportunity to catch up informally over a special SD&A Banquet dinner. For our 25th meeting, we enjoyed fine dining at an Italian restaurant in San Francisco’s Union Square while reminiscing over the conference’s history. One treat was that Conference Chair Andrew Woods (Curtin Univ.) – who attended virtually via live video link from Australia – enumerated the depth and breadth of the most frequently-cited SD&A publications over the 25 year history of the conference.

The SD&A conference also presented its annual awards in stereoscopic cinema, 3D technology, and best use of stereoscopy. The stereoscopic cinema session is always a big hit, with contest entries judged by Bernard Mendiburu, Julien Flack, and Lenny Lipton. Winners received a copy of the SD&A DVD-ROM which contains over 1,500 technical manuscripts in the 3D sciences.

The SD&A 3D Theater Best of Show Award in the Live Action category was awarded to: “Soir de Fête” by David Robert (France).

The SD&A 3D Theater Best of Show Award in the Animation / CG category was awarded to: “Morpheos Trailer” by John Hart (USA).

The SD&A Award for Best Use of Stereoscopy in a Technical Presentation was awarded to: “Stereoscopic cell visualization: from mesoscopic to molecular scale,” by Björn Summer, Christian Bender, Tobias Hoppe, Christian Gamroth, and Lukas Jelonek of the Univ. Bielefeld (Germany).

The SD&A Award for the Best Technical Demonstration by a conference author was awarded to the zSpace System of zSpace, Inc., in conjunction with the presentation “Description of a 3D display with motion parallax and direct interaction,” by Mark Flynn and Jerry Tu.

Finally, the conference experimented with a unique activity for SD&A’s Silver Jubilee: a “Magical Mystery 3D Bus Tour” of prestigious Silicon Valley companies engaged in stereoscopy, organized by committee member John Stern and Andrew Woods. Conference attendees enjoyed impressive technological demonstrations at Intuitive Surgical and NVIDIA Corporation, such as a tele-operated laparoscopic surgical system, and the advanced rendering feats behind the real-time animated human, “Digital Ira.”

Many of the technical presentations at SD&A 2014 were recorded and these will be made available via the conference website over the next few months as processing is completed. The technical manuscripts from the conference will be published in the conference proceedings volume which will be available in April:

Woods, Holliman, Favalora (eds) (2014) “Stereoscopic Displays and Applications XXV,” Proceedings of SPIE-IS&T Electronic Imaging, SPIE Vol. 9011, San Francisco (February 2014).

Planning for the 2015 Electronic Imaging and SD&A events are already under way, and will be held during the week of 8-12 February 2015, in downtown San Francisco.

More information about the Stereoscopic Displays and Applications (SD&A) Conference…

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G-SYNC Do-It-Yourself Upgrade Kits Now Available from Nvidia

January 15th, 2014 · 4 Comments · General 3D News

Nvidia has made available the G-SYNC DIY Upgrade kits for the ASUS VG248QE monitor available in their store, unfortunately they can be ordered only by people living in the US or Canada (as previously announced). The kit is being sold for $199 USD and you need to already have the monitor available in order to upgrade it to support the new G-SYNC technology. According to Nvidia the installation process should take approximately 30 minutes and it essentially covers the complete replacement of the LCD driver board and the power supply that the ASUS VG248QE uses with the ones included in the Upgrade kit.

You can order the G-SYNC Do-It-Yourself Upgrade Kit from Nvidia here…
Download an installation guide for the G-SYNC Do-It-Yourself Mod in PDF format…

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More Nvidia G-SYNC Monitors Getting Announced at CES 2014

January 7th, 2014 · 6 Comments · General 3D News

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Not only ASUS announced a new G-SYNC monitor – the ROG SWIFT PG278Q G-SYNC monitor at CES 2014, but most other Nvidia partners that are expected to launch monitor with built-in support for the G-SYNC technology have shown their upcoming products. The ASUS ROG SWIFT PG278Q however remains the most interesting product as it is the first one with official support for 120Hz resolution on a panel that goes beyond Full HD resolution, even though not 3D Vision support for it has been announced. All other announced models are in the form of 24-inch and 27-inch models with 1080p resolution and apparently only BenQ’s products will have support for the 3D Vision technology, or at least only that company is talking about 3D Vision support on their upcoming G-SYNC products.


List of Upcoming G-Sync Monitors:

ASUS ROG SWIFT PG278Q – 2560×1440- 27-inch – 120+Hz
BenQ XL2720G – 1920×1080 – 27-inch – 144Hz – 3D Vision
BenQ XL2420G – 1920×1080 – 24-inch – 144Hz – 3D Vision
Philips 272G5DYEB – 1920×1080 – 27-inch – 144Hz
ViewSonic VX2457GML – 1920×1080 – 24-inch

The 27-inch Philips 272G5DYEB is going to be a Full HD monitor with G-SYNC support and 144Hz maximum refresh rate, no 3D Vision support, but we did not expect to see that feature available on a Philips product anyway as the company has not yet released even a single 3D Vision ready product although it has multiple models with over 60Hz refresh rate and 3D support. Philips 272G5DYEB should be available this spring with expected end user price of $649 USD. The BenQ XL2420G and BenQ XL2420G are respectively 24-inch and 27-inch models with Full HD resolution and G-SYNC support and BenQ does mention 3D Vision mode available in their press release, though you would probably need an external 3D Vision kit to use these display in stereo 3D mode. The BenQ XL2420G and BenQ XL2420G monitors should be available in Q1 2014 according to the company, or with other words probably earlier than the ASUS G-SYNC monitor, prices however haven’t been revealed for now. There is also the 24-inch ViewSonic VX2457GML monitor that will also be a Full HD display, but there are still not that much details about this one. AOC should be announcing their G-SYNC enabled solutions and maybe some time soon we can also get to see an announcement for a 4K display with support for G-SYNC.

Aside form these announcements about monitors, Nvidia has also announced that people in the US and Canada that own the ASUS VG248QE monitor would be able to very soon order the G-SYNC DIY Upgrade kit from the NVIDIA Store for $199, presumably available there by the end of the week. If you don’t live in US or Canada however you would still be out of luck and not able to easily get your hands on early on a G-SYNC kit or a monitor with one, unless you are willing to play quite a lot of money on top to import one from US. So better wait for the upcoming products that will come with built-in G-SYNC support in the the following months…

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