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Entries Tagged as 'Other S3D Tech'

Review of the ViewSonic V3D241wm-LED 3D-capable Monitor

March 29th, 2013 · 5 Comments · Other S3D Tech

viewsonic-v3d241wm-led-monitor


The ViewSonic V3D241wm-LED 3D-capable 120Hz LCD monitor is not a new model, it was announced back in 2010, but I just recently had the chance to get my hands on it, so I’ve decided to run some tests on it as it is still available and can be purchased and thee aren’t many reviews of it available. What is interesting about this particular 3D monitor from ViewSonic is the fact that it comes bundled with a pair of wired glasses that connect directly to the display itself and not to the computer. Originally this monitor was intended to be used with the iZ3D Driver and be compatible with both Nvidia and AMD-based graphics, but since the development of that software has been ceased for some time (the driver is still available for download) I also wanted to see what other options do you have in using it in 3D at the moment. The fact that the iZ3D driver is not longer in development means that although the old version of software may work, it may not work well with newer games. For example I could not make the latest version of the iZ3D software work at all under Windows 8, though I still managed to make the monitor work in stereo 3D even under Windows 8, but not with the iZ3D driver.


ViewSonic V3D241wm-LED Specifications:

Display size: 23.6″ (60 cm) Wide, 16:9 Full HD
Panel Technology: TN (Twisted Nematic)
Resolution: 1920×1080 @ 120Hz
Response time: 5ms (typical) / 2ms (Gray to Gray)
Colours: 16.7M (6 bit + HiFRC)
Contrast ratio: 1000:1 (20,000,000:1 Dynamic)
Brightness: 300 cd/m2
Viewing angle: 170°/160°
Pixel pitch: 0.2715 mm
PPI (pixels per inch): 92
Integrated Speakers: 2x 2w (SRS Premium Sounds)
Wall-mount: 100 mm x 100 mm
Connections: Analog (D-sub), Digital (DVI-D), HDMI, Internal Power Supply, 3.5mm audio jack in/out, USB type-B for wired 3D glasses
Power consumption: 35 W (typical) w/o Audio / 38 W (maximum) with Audio
Dimensions: 563.6×417.8×260.8 mm
Weight: 5.1 Kg


viewsonic-active-3d-shutter-glasses-wired


If you are a long time stereoscopic 3D user like me you may remember seeing and even using active shutter glasses like the ones on the picture above that are shipped with the ViewSonic V3D241wm monitor. I have seen very similar design 3D glasses back in the 2000 with GeForce 2 graphics, though they were not completely identical in the design, the shutters are probably the same. Using the ViewSonic glasses in 3D mode they make the black color grayish and generally the look and feel of the image gets colder, other than that and the fact that they look old school and and not overly comfortable for wearing they do perform decent. Another thing that I did not like much about these glasses is the fact that their cable is not very flexible and you’d want a more flexible cable when you have to connect the glasses with a wire to the display.


3d-vision-generic-crt-display-support


The good news with the ViewSonic is that it works just fine with a 3D Vision Kit and there is not even the need to use and EDID override driver, you can just enable the Generic CRT Display mode that was removed a while ago from the 3D Vision drivers, but is now apparently back. In fact using an EDID override from another 3D Vision-ready display produces worse ghosting/crosstalk as compared to when using the Generic CRT mode. Due to the fact that I was not able to make the iZ3D Driver work I was not able to compare with the results achieved when using the Generic CRT Display mode, but I suspect that the level of ghosting/crosstalk would be a bit less with the iZ3D software. The good news is that with the Generic CRT Display mode enabled from the 3D Vision drivers you can use both the ViewSonic 3D glasses as well as 3D Vision glasses and they produce pretty much the same level of ghosting/crosstalk though the image seems warmer when viewed through the 3D Vision glasses. You however need to have a 3D Vision IR emitter connected to the computer in order to be able to enable the Generic CRT Display mode, so even only with an emitter connected you could use the wired glasses.


viewsonic-v3d241wm-not-calibrated
viewsonic-v3d241wm-calibrated


Here is how the display performs in terms of color reproduction, the first image shows the performance of the out of the box factory settings and the second one is after we’ve calibrated the monitor. We’ve measured maximum brightness level of 260 cd/m2 and that is with the default setting of 70 for Contrast and after calibration the color accuracy improves a bit with the brightness staying above 200 cd/m2. Have in mind that these measurements were made using the 60Hz refresh rate mode of the display as as long as you activate 120Hz the monitor enters in 3D mode automatically and the brightness gets reduced significantly. This happens only at 120Hz refresh rate, at the lower 110Hz and 100Hz refresh rates the image is brighter, though 110Hz is not useable for stereo 3D mode with the Generic CRT display mode, but the 100Hz is.


viewsonic-v3d241wm-not-calibrated-120hz


These are the readings of the display’s color performance when it is running with 120Hz refresh rate without calibration, as you can see the 3D mode is with a maximum brightness level of just 87 cd/m2, something similar to what happens when you activate the 3D Lightboost technology on a more recent display, though the panel used here does not feature a scanning backlight as the 3D Lightboost-enabled monitors do. The monitor uses a CMO M236H5-L0A LCD panel, something very similar to the one used by the Acer GN245HQ 3D-capable display. The only good thing here is that the black point measures at just 0.09 Cd/m2 so you still get a contrast ratio of almost 1000:1 even though the brightness level is a bit below the comfortably useable level for most people and the perceived brightness gets even lower when you put on the shutter glasses. This could’ve been acceptable only if it has helped in significantly reducing the level of ghosting/crosstalk that you would normally get, but unfortunately it did not help much.


viewsonic-v3d241wm-extreme-ghosting


It is time to check the crosstalk performance of the monitor in stereo 3D mode, first is the test with the extreme crosstalk photos. The results are wore that what we are used in seeing in the more recent 3D-capable displays, but you should not forget that this is in fact a 2010 model of 3D display, so for back at that time the situation wasn’t that bad when comparing to other available products.


viewsonic-v3d241wm-sailboats-test


Next is the sailboats stereoscopic 3D test video for more real-world performance comparison, here we see a bit of ghosting and it is mostly what I use to call color ghosting/crosstalk that is a direct result of the use of an Overdrive technology to make the pixels respond faster. In this test the performance is a bit worse than on other 3D displays from that period.


viewsonic-v3d241wm-tru


The other test for crosstalk/ghosting using a real world game example to measure, namely Tomb Raider: Underworld also shows not so good performance in terms of crosstalk. Both on the top and bottom parts of the display there is quite a lot of crosstalk available, though the fact that we are using the Generic CRT Display mode for these tests may also be a reason to have a bit more ghosting/crosstalk, it is not a reason enough to have a color ghosting as you can see at the bottom.

One of the best things about the ViewSonic V3D241wm-LED 3D-capable monitor is the fact that it has very little input lag and feels very responsive in 120Hz refresh rate, though the brightness is a bit low, though is a darkened room it feels very natural also because of the very low black level. By using an EDID override you can also have higher brightness in 120Hz if you don’t need the stereo 3D mode. I’ve measured up to about 7ms input lag as maximum with the help of a custom device for measuring input lag that I’m currently working on (more details about that when the project is finalized). The crosstalk/ghosting performance of the display is not very good and is far form what the latest offerings on the market have to offer, so not much point in getting this display new at the moment, but it might not be a bad choice if you get a good deal with a very attractive price and you don’t plan on using it in stereo 3D mode. If you plan on using it in stereo 3D mode the good thing is that even though the iZ3D Driver is no longer supported and developed you can use the display with the 3D Vision software, you might also be able to make it work with the TriDef 3D software on ATI/AMD-hardware, though I was not able to test that personally, so there is no guarantee if it will work.

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Reviews of Different 3D-Capable LCD Monitors Here on the Blog

March 16th, 2013 · 1 Comment · Other S3D Tech


I haven’t updated the list of the 3D-capable LCD monitors that I’ve reviewed so far here on the blog for a while, so I decided it is time to do it. In order to make it a bit more easier to find the reviews if you’ve missed them when they were published or in order to compare your device to others. I’ll also include some of the models that I still haven’t been able to review, but I do plan to test at some point if possible in order to compare them with the competition (the list is not complete with all 3D-capable products of course), so it will be easier for you to decide on what best fits your needs and requirements.


Tested 3D-capable LCD Monitors:

27″ Acer HN274H
24″ Acer GD245HQ/GD235HZ
24″ Acer GN245HQ
27″ Asus VG278H
24″ Asus VG236HE
23″ Asus VG23AH
24″ BenQ XL2411T
23″ LG W2363D
23″ Philips 236G3DHSB
23″ Planar SA2311W


Not Yet tested 3D-capable LCD Monitors:

– 27″ Acer HN274H B
– 27″ Acer HR274H
– 24″ Acer HS244HQ
– 23″ Acer GR235H
– 23″ Acer GR235HA
– 23″ Alienware OptiX AW2310
– 23″ AOC d2357Ph
– 27″ AOC d2757Ph
– 27″ Asus VG278HE
– 24″ Asus VG248QE
– 24″ BenQ XL2410T
– 24″ BenQ XL2420T/TX
– 23″ Hannstar HS233
– 23″ HP 2311gt
– 24″ Lenovo L2363dwA
– 23″ LG 23 LG D2342P
– 27″ Samsung S27A950
– 27″ Samsung S27A750
– 27″ Samsung T27A950
– 23″ Samsung S23A950
– 23″ Samsung S23A750
– 23″ Samsung S23A700D
– 24″ Sony PlayStation 3D Display
– 27″ ViewSonic V3D271
– 24″ ViewSonic V3D241wm
– 24″ ViewSonic V3D245

In the future I’ll also try to expand the coverage of 3D-capable products reviewed here, so that it will be easier for you, the readers to make the right choice. But it isn’t always easy to get access to all of the released products for a review, actually it is quite hard most of the time, and I don’t have unlimited resources in order to buy all the products that I want to review. So any help and support is appreciated.

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List of Helix Mod Game Fixes for Better 3D Vision Support

March 2nd, 2013 · 4 Comments · Other S3D Tech

modified-shader-code


If you are a stereoscopic 3D gamer playing games using Nvidia’s 3D Vision or 3DTV Play solutions, then you should be well aware of the fact that it is not very often that new games come with perfect stereoscopic 3D support. Some games can become much better looking in stereo 3D support with just a few simple tweaks and other require more serious attention, but game developers rarely take the time think about these, in fact most developers are still ignoring the constantly growing number of stereo 3D gamers that probably already is a few millions large market. So it is up to the stereoscopic 3D community to think about solutions to finding a way to deal with the problems in games that need fixing for better stereoscopic 3D support and the results are quite good so far. One very popular such solution referred to as the Helix Mod which is essentially a DirectX 9 wrapper DLL file that can give you the ability to modify the pixel and vertex shaders in games using DirectX 9 to get them to work better in stereoscopic 3D mode. The person going under the username Helix who made the solution has shared it so everyone could help and people are already contributing various solutions with removed or modified shaders in games that cause issues when rendered in stereo 3D mode. This mod is intended for 3D Vision and the fixes available are targeted at users with 3D Vision or 3DTV Play setups, so it may not work with other solutions for stereoscopic 3D gaming. Here is a list of fixes for various games that are available so far that can help you get better experience when playing in stereoscopic mode using 3D Vision or 3DTV Play:

List of games with rewritten shaders:
007 Legends
Alice: Madness Returns
Aliens Colonial Marines
All Zombies Must Die
Assassins Creed 2
Assassins Creed: Brotherhood
Assassins Creed: Revelations
Bioshock 1
Black Mesa
Blur
Borderlands
Borderlands 2
BulletStorm
Burnout Paradise
Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3
Clive Barker’s Jericho
Dark Messiah of Might & Magic
Dark Souls: Prepare to Die
Darkness II
Darksiders
DarkSiders 2
Dead Space 1
Dead Space 2
Dead Space 3
Devil May Cry 4]
Diablo III
Dishonored
DmC Devil may Cry
Dragon Age: Origins
Dragon Age 2
Dungeon Defenders
Fallout 3
Fallout: New Vegas
Family Guy: Back to the Multiverse
Farcry 2
FarCry 3
Grand Theft Auto IV
Ghostbusters: The Video Game
Guild Wars 2
Hunted: The Demon’s Forge
I am Alive
Insane 2
Kingdom of Amalur: Reckoning
Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light
Legend of Grimrock
Mass Effect 1
Mass Effect 2
Mass Effect 3
Miasmata
Mirror’s Edge
MX vs AVT Reflex
Need for Speed: Underground
NiGHTS into Dreams
Orcs Must Die
Orcs Must Die 2
Prince of Persia
Prince of Persia: Forgotten Sands
Prototype 1
Prototype 2
Psychonauts
Pure
Rainbow Six: Vegas 2
Resident Evil: Operation Raccoon City
Rise of Flight
Sega Rally Revo
Sanctum
Scania Truck Driving Simulator
Singularity
Sinemora
Skydrift
Elder Scrolls: Skyrim
Smash Cars
Sonic 4:Episode 2
Sonic Generations
Sonic & Sega All Stars
Spec Ops: The Line
Tony Hawk Pro Skater HD
Toy Soldiers
Transformers: Fall of Cybertron
Unreal Tournament 3
Vampire Masquerade: Bloodlines
Viking: Battle for Asgard
War Thunder
X3: Terran Conflict/Albion Prelude
XCOM: Enemy Unknown
X-MEN Origins: Wolverine

List of games with removed shaders:
Lego Batman 2
Binary Domain
Blur
Call of Duty 4:Modern Warfare
Colin McRae’s Dirt 1
Crash Time 4
Crusader Kings 2
Drakensang
Fable
Fable 3
Jade Empire
Kings Bounty: Warrior of the North
Mad Riders
Nail’d
Need for Speed: Hot pursuit
Overlord 2
PES 2012
Prince of Persia: The Two Thrones
Quantum Conundrum
Shoot Many Robots
Splinter Cell: Conviction
Tomb Raider: Legend
Velvet Assasin
Viking Battle for Asgard
Wheelman
Wolfenstein 2009

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